In Progress Spheres of Influence
02-25-2016, 05:05 PM (This post was last modified: 07-24-2016 04:45 PM by Kocel.)
Post: #51
RE: Spheres of Influence
Name:The Stalwart Republic of Wheatvale

Government: Democratic Council, led by a Council President. Wheatvale consists of many farming settlements and at least three major trading hubs, one of which is a port. Presidents have no set term limit, by intent, as Wheatvale tradition is that the older one becomes the wiser they are considered. The Council President wields the Silver Pitchfork of Providence, which, despite being said to have magic powers, is just a pitchfork. It's a really nice one, though, and the ends are reeeeaaal pointy.

Leader: Council President Patsmith "Poppa" Pilveruth is a long-standing member of the Council, and President of a tenure of ten years and going. Forty years young, Poppa Pilveruth has the health and stamina of a man half his age, and the charisma of one as well. He tours the towns and villages of Wheatvale, silver pitchfork always in hand and a stalk of grain clenched between his teeth. He holds to his office not out of lust for power, but simply because he feels he's the only one capable of "runnin' things right-like." He's constantly searching for apprentices and students to groom for the responsibility of political office. Also, Poppa Pilveruth always travels alone. While this would raise concerns for his safety, given the... Threats that seem to arise from the neighboring Mortenwood, Poppa always arrives at his destination unharmed.

Society: Mostly humans. The Stalwart Republic is not the most intolerant of nations, but neither is it the most welcoming. They fear most anyone who comes from beyond the Mortenwood, the deep and dangerous forests that surround Wheatvale, tainted by dark magics from eons past, and thus view outsiders with a healthy dose of xenophobia. Still, their culture has a tradition of hospitality, and this often trumps their paranoia. They have proud farming and sea-faring traditions, but do not be fooled by the peaceful facade. Thanks to the ever-present threat of the Mortenwood, the citizens of Wheatvale are ever-ready for combat, and most train their children in martial schools from very young ages. A Wheatvale Farmer is listed in Galva Elanius's Things Most Likely to Brutally Murder You If Provoked, and many legends surround what they are capable of doing with farm-tools alone.

History: It is long believed that Wheatvale is one of the oldest human civilizations. Starting out as a kingdom, with a coastal port city as its capital, the Kingdom of Wheatvale flourished in a golden age once they mastered the arts of agriculture, expanding outward into the surrounding hills and valleys and reaping the rich resources they held.

Then, one day, they got too close to the Mortenwood.

As if they had awoken an ancient curse, twisted, vile beasts began to trickle from the forest's borders, forming roving bands of monsters that ravaged the countryside and, eventually, over-ran the capital.

All seemed lost. That is, until, a farmer, wracked with grief, took up a humble pitchfork and led an offensive to retake his old village...

Against all odds, his assault was successful. He gathered survivors, built up defenses more suited to keeping out the beasts, and, by day, led attacks on any known roving packs of monsters. Eventually, Wheatvale was liberated. But the king and the royal family were dead, almost as if the creatures had targeted them expressly. Not feeling worthy of taking the title of royalty, the Farmer decided to use the system he had been using to keep peace in his village to keep peace over the whole country. Thus, the Stalwart Republic of Wheatvale was born. Still, the menace of the Mortenwood is not defeated, and bands of monsters still to this day emerge from its depths, their sole purpose to wipe out every living sentient being in Wheatvale. The worldwide magical community agrees that dark magic is at work here, but no party sent into the woods has returned alive.

Cities:

Hearthport: The capital of Wheatvale as well as the former capital of The Old Kingdom. The city is a mix of old stone and new wood architecture, and this mix is reflected in its culture. Old Kingdom plays are performed in theaters alongside modern works, transcripts of Old Kingdom books are made alongside farmer's almanacs, and all throughout the city the old coexists with the new. Notable structures include The Great Hall of the People, formally the palace of the Old King, wherein the Council of Elders meets to discuss matters of state, the Great Ol' Opry House, an Old Kingdom theater with newer additions built onto it, the Stretching Docks, the vast docks where traders and fishermen alike dock their vessels, the Hart and Iron, the oldest tavern in Wheatvale, sporting an exhibit of taxidermied Mortenbeasts slain and donated by its clients, and, finally, the Great Chapel, a house of worship once dedicated to the Old Gods, now dedicated to the Old Harvester, the god of the monotheistic faith casually worshipped by most of the nation.

Stonefoot - at the foot of the mountains of Underzweig, it's not hard to guess how this city got its name. Supported by stone-cutting and the farming of heartier crops, Stonefoot's people tend to be more brisk and hardy to colder temperatures than most. They share a mixed heritage of Old Kingdom culture and, as some families claim, blood of a former tribe of Cossacks that settled in the region long ago. Not the Pulovians. The Pulovians are a sore subject. Bringing them up is an easy way to start a fight in Stonefoot. Notable structures include the City Hall, an imposing, cold structure made of stone, with a noticeable Dwarven influence in the architecture, if not just by imitation, the Shale Garden, a public park of stone sculptures, which is constantly added to by the local artists of the city, Iron Street, the center of Wheatvale's metalworking industry, and the Beer-Garten, a tavern stylized after Dwarven taverns, which is fighting a never-ending battle to recreate the taste of authentic Dwarven Beer. Dwarven tourists normally visit it to laugh at them.


Bowerglen - One can't get more peaceful or boring in Wheatvale than Bowerglen. Far away from the Mortenwood, while still a decent distance away from the mountains and the Pulovians, Bowerglen is a popular location to start a family. It is, as such, also a center of industry for Wheatvale, as much industry as there can be. Notable locations in Bowerglen include: Councilman Hall, the local place of government in Bowerglen, a friendly looking building made of wood, with fired clay shingles, the Museum of Bowerglen, a museum dedicated to the history of the city, the Bowermarket, a large, open-air market where various merchants can sell their goods, and The Big Building We Don't Talk About, a large stone structure consisting of one large, open internal room with a domed ceiling and a stone altar at the center. It was definitely never a place of occult worship. The town definitely never had to go in and kill a bunch of cultists from their midst. It is also definitely not the secret base of the Inquisition, an ancient order meant to hunt out occult worship of forces from the Mortenwood. Move along. Nothing to see here.

The Inquisition, as it is, consists of a bunch of half-crazed old men who meet to discuss the "good ol' days", occasionally breaking up to accuse each other of treachery, only to resolve that their order is still as solid as it used to be. There really isn't much to see there. City Watch still forbids and non-Inquisition members from loitering in the area. Can't have the cults starting back up. The cults that definitely never existed.

Valley Hold - The Unofficial Capital of Wheatvale, as it is sometimes called, Valley Hold was the first town reclaimed from the hordes of the Mortenwood after the Old Kingdom's fall. It sports little Old Kingdom architecture, however, as it was just a small farming village then. Now, however, it is an important hub of trade and military activity. Notable locations here include Old Fort Dale, named after General Dale, a Wheatvalian national hero, the Old Fort is an imposing structure of wood and stone. A statue of General Dale, commissioned from Stonefoot forty years ago, stands outside, depicting an old man in military uniform brandishing a pitchfork. Also in Valley Hold, Town Hall, a large building that has very clearly been added to time and time again throughout the years, Old Valley, the oldest part of town, also home of the graveyard housing the remains of original villagers, slain in the Great Fall, the Great Parade Grounds, located near Old Fort Dale, and Old Cranky, Wheatvale's oldest standing windmill.

Gravesplains - Located closest to the Mortenwood, Gravesplains is a city of necessity. It needs to exist to house the troops that patrol the forest's borders, it needs to exist to monitor Mortenwood activity, and it needs to exist to bury those who can't afford to be carted back to their homes for burial. It is a stark, depressing place. Notable locations: Fort Starkwall - Named after General Starkwall, who dedicated his life to protecting Wheatvale from the creatures of the Mortenwood. It stands connected to the city walls, facing out towards the Mortenwood, with cannons lining its walls. The Barren Field - a field of graves for those who fell to the monsters of the Mortenwood. The field is divided between civilians and soldiers. Marky's - Marcus Skent VIII, the owner, is part of the Skent family, who have provided quality arms to the people of Gravesplains for generations. It was Marcus Skent the First who designed the first Battlefork, and later the War Scythe, working with materials the locals had on hand. Though... Eccentric... The craftsmanship on his weapons were superb, and, along with his efficiency, his work is often credited with turning the tide against the creatures of the Mortenwood after the Great Fall. He took up shop in Gravesplains late by necessity, to be nearer to those who needed his work. Finally, there's the Alabaster Mask, a... Comedy club. Even the solemn soldiers of Gravesplains need a place to relax, and this tavern is their go-to place. Above ground it's a regular establishment, but the basement has been converted into a theater with stage, bar, and seating. The Mask has become a community center of sorts, and sometimes a local theater company will put on adaptions of Hearthport plays there as well.

Weapon: That There Big Thing We Got In The Box Yonder - Towards the end of his life, The First President managed to ensare one of the deadliest creatures to come from the Mortenwood in a clever trap, sealing it within an oaken crate, promising that he wouldn't emerge until released. Now the crate sits in the basement of the Great Hall, collecting dust and cobwebs. Occasionally a rat will creep between the boards, resulting in only a distressed squeak before sudden silence, never emerging again. Should Wheatvale ever need to defend itself against a foreign foe, the Big Thing In the Box Yonder is their last and final hope.
Reply
02-26-2016, 02:05 AM (This post was last modified: 03-10-2016 06:39 AM by Bramzter.)
Post: #52
RE: Spheres of Influence
Name: The Witch-Realm of Andúr and Rauthúrian Territories

Government: Andúr and its outcroppings are ruled under Autocratic Stewardship, High roles within the realm are given out on the basis of a meritocracy. The council can propose actions and laws and manage smaller charges but the steward has the final say in the actions taken by the realm, The steward can appoint several apprentices which can compete for a chance of becoming next in line for stewardship. None so far have been deemed qualified however.

Leader: As so far there has only been one Steward of Andúr; Pestádir Wizard of Many Colors. A wise scholar appointed long ago by a failing and decaying empire, mostly to keep the local mingling of tribes and villages in check. After the fall of that empire she scholar styled himself as the wizard named Pestádir the Wise. His strength was not in magic but in sheer charisma and a compelling voice. Mostly still a scholar his main concern is the advancement of the realm, the enrichment of knowledge and the start of a one man industrial revolution across the desolate province... However Pestádir hasn't been seen directly in many many years. His will is furthered by his apprentices and several robe clad strangers seem the only ones who are allowed within Pestádir's chambers.

Society: A number of Dire Men tribes live on the hills and wastelands surrounding the mountains of Andúr which are currently inhabited by a lingering Kethúl mining colony and the old mountain fortress from the old empire days mostly inhabited by humans. The land is dominated by a large black tower rising from the mountains and it is where Pestádir has taken residence and conducts his studies.

The communities leave each-other well enough alone but in recent times agents of Pestádir the Wise have started a effort to unify the inhabitants under one banner no matter the means used.

History: Andúr and the surrounding Rauthúrian always were poorer regions in comparison with their neighbors but was still of interest to the empires that it got incorporated in. The native population were mostly hill men who lived in tribes but still possessed enough warriors to make the empire not want to deal with them. Minerals and treasure were found in the mountains drawing the Kéthul settle and make a deal with the hill tribes. They provided better tools and weapons for the hill tribes and in turn were allowed to settle.

The local imperial steward repeatedly tried to assert dominance in the region but didn't succeed and soon the empire and the people of Andúr were on the brink of war which resulted in the construction of the mountain fortress and tower of Morthguárdain and a growing revolt and expulsion of the empire's garrison in the province and after that the short lived state of Rauthúrian.

However the Empire did not tolerate such open disobedience and their mages struck back with the world's first demonstration of a magical mega spell, ironically forcing the hill men to flee into the former imperial strongholds due to the sheer desolation the spell had caused.

The Empire planned to use more of such spells to utterly crush the whole province. Yet the interference of a small group of scholars including Pestádir argued for a more peaceful resolution saving further bloodshed and eventually Pestádir was appointed steward and remained so even after the empire fell and new nations arose, He remained on good terms with the hill men living within the fortress and worked on a way to revert the damage done to the land.. However out of the surrounding lands Dire Men were chased off from the neighboring lands and settled in the hills and the wastelands. The lands became known as the Witchrealm of Andúr filling the dark imaginations and lore of their neighbors, It was considered a cursed and dreadful land by most people

All this came to pass under the watch of a grand obsidian tower. It secrets and lore laid secure within its darkened halls. Only recently it has been reported that a strange white glow shines from its windows as the self-styled Wizard Steward of Andúr continues his highly guarded machinations

Weapon: The Acolyte's Eye - The exact manner of replicating the first mega spell that struck Andúr have been lost to time and the death of the empire. Yet the theory was a simple one. Saturate the land with magic till it dies or mutates into a unlivable place. Unfortunately it seemed to drain the caster lives as well, This is why acolyte's were used. they were living batteries for the spells.

Pestádir found a way around that as well as making it more controllable, using a modified eye of a acolyte from that time and a seeing stone he can call down a smaller version of such a mega spell upon a specific location. it may be weaker and still cost a of power and resources, it is precise and doesn't kill you for casting it.

After a target is chosen using a seeing stone the spell manifests as a white great eye surrounded by glow of magic at the top of the tower which cast its gaze toward the target area saturating the lands with magic which will devastate the land once it focuses. However every time it is used it saps a little of the caster's soul slowly turning the caster into a unseen wraith..

Theme:


Reply
02-26-2016, 08:35 AM (This post was last modified: 02-26-2016 09:48 AM by chimericWilder.)
Post: #53
RE: Spheres of Influence
Name: Teór Aradel

History: Once upon a time, a lone dragon decided that he wanted to found a kingdom. Being blessed with long life and unusual patience, he set out to do so. To begin, the dragon kidnapped a small population of Kethúl clods, whom he gave the simple choice to either work for him or be devoured. Being a rather one-sided choice, the kethúl soon sat to work devising plans to excavate the dragon's mountain home of Teór Aradel ("The mountain Aradel"), and soon enough they were hard at work carving out great halls of stone that would come to span throughout the mountain, as the dragon had directed. In return for their aid, the dragon kept them fed and healthy and, much to their surprise, even helped in the ambitious excavation on occasion. Over time, the dragon brought in other folk to work as the clods saw fit. A family of farmers, recently made destitute and homeless following a poor harvest. An injured sarin, left behind by his tribe. A group of vox, rejected everywhere they went. To each of these and more, the dragon said, "Work for me and you shall have a home, food and safety within my halls of stone. Refuse, and be gone." To this, few could say no, and soon a small farming community spread out around Teór Aradel, felling the trees of the Jynwood to provide timber and fertile farmland both. By the time the first harvest came, the people of the mountain had made for themselves a home that would last, and merchants soon came to do trade.

Rumours spread from there. The dragon took no tax or levy. The dragon welcomed any regardless of standing, occupation, species or belief. The dragon decreed only a few essential laws. The dragon's lands were rich and unspoiled. If you had nothing, the dragon would provide for you for a certain period of time, or until you could provide for yourself. Whatever fears folk initially held were soon forgotten, for the dragon proved fair to those who deserved fairness, and merciless to those who did not. Many were the reasons to pack up and move to Teór Aradel, for unlike many a lord, the dragon only asked one thing of his people: when the dragon called, you obeyed, regardless of who or what you were. Naturally, this one demand was amble reason for many to stay in their own homes where they had always lived, regardless of whether or not they had anything to gain from traveling to the mountain home. Yet the dragon rarely commanded anything be done that would not serve the people of Teór Aradel in the long run, and so the stone halls filled with people, and neighbouring kingdoms could only watch with concern as their people trickled away. Perhaps advisors counceled for war or strict regulations that might prevent folk from leaving altogether. But war never came, and folk never stopped from traveling to the mountain home, though by now there were other, much smaller communities and villages spreading out from Teór Aradel, a few folk braving the forest for one reason or another.

Atleast, thats the story most folks are told when they come to Teór Aradel. No doubt folk elsewhere tell it differently, cursing the name of the dragon out of fear or hate, believing it to be a powerful demon with a honeyed tongue or some other such. Whatever the case, the real history is a little more complicated than either of those things. And yet it has been only a few generations since the dragon set out to build a kingdom of its own, and it lives still at the top of Teór Aradel.

Leader: The Dragon Aradel: Having never offered a name, most folk refer to the dragon either as Aradel, after the mountain, or simply as 'the dragon'. Despite having personally led Teór Aradel for nearly a mún lifetime, the dragon is still a mystery to the settlers of that place. Over the years, a few scholars have made it their work to record every word spoken by the dragon, as the dragon's word is the closest to concrete law available. On occasion, these men have found that the dragon contradicts himself in word and in action. For instance, he has been known for stating that he has little patience for the foolishness of men (during the judgement of a dispute between two farmers), yet it is well-known that the dragon makes it his task to see to such judgements. This has been commmonly interpreted as the dragon's dislike for wasting time on minor matters, and so some of these scribes (and a few other folk) have taken it upon themselves to reference what has been previously spoken by the dragon in order to resolve conflict... or to gain personal advantage.

Ofcourse, none but the dragon knows the truth of why he acts as he does, or what is behind the great stone gates at the top of Teór Aradel.

Society: While any are welcome in Teór Aradel, it is natural that it is only certain groups of people who are compelled to actually make the trip. After all, the dragon had little patience for the priviledges of the nobility. But the dragon did take in both the poor, the lost and the outcasts, aswell as free-thinkers, opportunists, pioneers and anyone else who did not find themselves at home among the varying societies of established kingdoms. The dragon did not care for the specifics, as long as you were capable of taking care of yourself and did not cause undue trouble. Even so, the citizens of Teór Aradel were left mostly to themselves, and oftentimes it was they, rather than the dragon, who had to decide what was right or wrong, for the dragon had provided only three laws, carved into a gold-plated plaque that hung in the Aodr Pavah greathall at the center of Teór Aradel, which read as follows:
Do not disobey me
Do not steal
Do not kill save in self-defense or at my command
Because of this lack of rules, many would come to see Teór Aradel as a lawless place where most of anything was permitted, if you could get away with it. As it turned out, the dragon was determined to prove such rumours wrong, commanding his more loyal citizens to counter-act attempts at crime, whether related to theft or not, and bring them to him for judgement. And the dragon's judgements were harsh indeed, including such sentences as: "I decree that you shall work in the mines until the day you die," or "I take from you your every possession and give them away to any who would claim them," and other, similar sentences. But one sentence he reserved only for those who broke one or more of his three laws: those, the dragon personally roasted and ate for all to see. And so it was that while Teór Aradel was still regarded as lawless, rare was the thief brave enough to ply his trade there.

That left the population of Teór Aradel divided on how to regard the dragon. There were those who believed that the dragon was more fair and just than any ruler, and meddled less in their business besides. These obeyed the dragon without hesitation when the dragon called for a new house to be built, reparations to be made, or a new tunnel to be dug. For, afterall, they paid no taxes and so somebody had to care for these things, and as such there were always volunteers.

But there were also those who regarded the dragon with fear or scepticism, willing to benefit from the dragon's rule but unwilling to accept the dragon as ruler, or to live alongside one or more of the foreign people they shared Teór Aradel with - there were vox, nurkum and even blights, allowed to walk around freely! - or perhaps they had some other grievance with the dragon, such as having witnessed a friend or relative unfairly sentenced to death for the theft of an inkwell, or perhaps they hated having to obey whenever the dragon summoned workers for one thing or another. Whatever the case, the idea of killing the dragon has grown within the more fanatical of these individuals. After all, they did not need the dragon. Surely they could have this city without having to run and bow to the commands of the dragon. However powerful the dragon was, he walked among them freely, and it would be easy to stage a fatal ambush... or atleast, it would be if they could find some way to stop the more loyal citizens from tearing them to shreds afterwards.

If one were to discount the influence of the dragon, Teór Aradel otherwise worked much like an anarchy, where every individual was left to make their own life, with their own rules and their own choices.

Weapon: Lifeblood Lavalliere: A huge, exquisite ruby inset into a large golden gorget, elegantly carved with symbols and runes. Naturally, it is kept affixed to the dragon's breast by several sets of steel chains, and has almost come to be regarded as the badge of the dragon's office. Unknown to most, it is a magical weapon of extreme destructive potential, able to produce arcs of twisting red pulses of lightning, or something that resembles lightning at any rate, for though still quite fast, it does not share the nigh instantaneous speed of lightning, nor does it merely cause thundershock - instead, it disintegrates most of anything touched directly by the arc. This power comes at the cost of its users lifeblood, however, and would wither a man to a sickly shell of his former self within moments, never to recover. The effect it would have on a dragon, while somewhat slower, would be much the same. Of course, why bother with that when it is possible to instead feed the gem with the essence of one or more willing assistants?
Reply
02-26-2016, 11:32 AM (This post was last modified: 03-02-2016 10:00 AM by MQuinny1234.)
Post: #54
RE: Spheres of Influence
Name: Rudahog

Government: Dictatorship, ruled by the Dark Hand, with his will enforced by 2 deputies, the Elvár Witch of Mortenwood and Mort the Sarin, the bloody-handed monk. Mort rules his armies and militia, keeping the peace and control over Rudahog whilst the Witch is his advisor and intelligence-officer, organising spies and the magical forces of Rudahog, forewarning him of danger, second-guessing his plans and keeping him in check from making mistakes.

Leader: The Dark Hand is the title most of his subjects and foreign citizens would know him by. Those who try to research his true identity may find through 3rd or 4th hand accounts that those who closely serve him have referred to him as “Azerath” but beyond this not much is known for sure. He is assumed to be male and considering the original date of his appearance and gleams of history before his rise, at least within the age of 40, but he could be much older. He permanently wears a magical armour made from a black material, possible Onyx, that shifts to fit his body (similar style to the nightingale armour from skyrim). A plain black oval covers his face at all times, a thick black handaxe hangs from his belt, made from the same material as his armour and the only object of colour amongst his garbs is a blood red ruby hanging from his neck.

He seems to have some magical power, if not much skill, known for suddenly unleashing blasts of force in battle, or alighting enemies in flame, his amulet glowing as he does so. Rumours persist that he can rip the souls from helpless and dying foes to feed his power.

Despite the aura of menace he deliberately feeds, he is more ruthless than evil. He has slaughtered his foes alongside their families and inflicted incredibly cruelty and suffering on those who dared oppose him rather than immediately surrendering to his power, but this is solely to ensure none rise against or needlessly fight him rather than mere malice. In diplomatic situations he is either typically soft-spoken, and always gives an opposing group or political power a chance for surrender, but will fly into a rage if his offering is thrown in his face. Those that know him well, know that he is saddened and sickened by the acts he has taken but that the belief that he can make it all worth it keeps him going, that through force he will unite the world and finally then submit to his fate.

Society: The races of Mún obviously make up a large populace of Rudahog’s sprawling cities, alongside a spattering or other races such as Valtir and Kethúl. Across the barren landscape, Dire men, Nurkum and Vox can be found wandering. Rudahog is a nation that was known for constant battle and crime and other dark acts, where any group with enough power could travel to and cut out a slice of land for themselves to rule over, so despicable members of any race could be found there. Nowadays it is still a dark and miserable land of constant cloud cover, howling winds and dark nature, but is now brutally ordered and xenophobic, mostly because anyone wanting to live there should be viewed suspiciously. It still possesses a large standing army, with all its sergeants and upwards made solely of veterans of numerous wars. Groups of soldiers travel along the borders and from town to town, constantly on the march, either training or assisting in the reconstruction of town fortifications.

The citizens of Rudahog still are an unhappy bunch, with little control over their fates apparently and living in fear of the monster that rules them, but at least things are orderly now. Disappearances and public executions have replaced the random fighting and murder beforehand, but it’s known that those who suffer do so due to criminal activities and sedition. The citizenry are fed, unemployment is low and the chaos of the old days is gone. They console themselves that at least it’s better than how it used to be, right?

History: The nation of Rudahog is an old one, but was ruled by weak kings and swiftly changed regimes and dynasties over its lifetime, no one really cared about them really except possibly in the capital city. Generally crime families and warbands controlled each city and the surrounding landscape, constantly changing due to cut-throat politics and battle. No building in Rudahog is older than a hundred years that either hasn’t been rebuilt or fallen into uninhabited ruins. 20 years ago though, the Warband of the Black Axe, ruled by the Dark Hand appeared.

At first it seemed the same as any other mercenary group, but it didn’t stop growing. It’s possible that the kingpins and opposing warbands could have banded together to stop him, and some did, but it wasn’t enough. His soldiers and tactics in war were superior, the lengths to which he’d go for victory were longer and his control over his conquered territories that he hadn’t left burnt and ruined was too tight. Once opposing forces began to surrender outright and join his warband rather than be annihilated, he quickly steamrolled over the remaining city-states of Rudahog that suicidally refused to surrender. The remaining 10 years since then he has spent reinforcing his rule and repairing the damage he did in conquering his nation, as around a quarter of the populace and it’s cities was murdered and ransacked in the process.

Despite that his rise to power was one of the most brutal and bloody events witnessed in Rudahog, for once the country is not constantly in a state of war, mercenaries no longer rampage across the landscape, thieves and cutthroats have, if not totally eliminated in certain cities, been stifled. Gone are the capricious crime-kings and wandering warlords, now Rudahog is ruled by the Dark Hand alone, and his rule is absolute.

Weapon:
The Dark Hand long ago found a forgotten place, an ancient echo of a lost age. By himself he traversed deep into it, finding many strange artifacts. His ruby necklace, his onyx armour, his black axe, but these pale to what he found in the deepest part. On the floor amongst the dust, a book written by a great mage, in this ancient place, the power in its words alone holding off the ravages of time that had worn away the inscriptions upon the walls and magic scrolls and strange furniture, only that which was magic had survived time. When he left this place he had learnt much compared to entering, but much still was beyond him in the book

With the help of the witch of Mortenwood, he learnt how to understand some of its passages, but it was she who deciphered the secret spell hidden, that showed how to begin a ritual, a terrible spell of summoning.

The power necessary to cast the spell alone require sites at specific points along the leylines of Rudahog. There, sacrifices must be made over weeks of time, those suffering kept at the verge of death’s door until the final act where their pain-ridden souls are released and used to fuel the spell and call the being of doom. Once the actual spell is completed, those beings attuned to magic or the nature of the world can feel the warping of reality, as a gate opens upon the spell’s target, releasing an unnameable demon upon all nearby. At the moment, the sites have been constructed with numerous sacrifices already made, so all that is needed is one final rout of blood spilled and the ending rites to be spoke. All it needs apart from that is a target and boundaries set upon it's rampage.

The danger of this summoning is such that much of the ritual is designed to limit the demon’s understanding of the world it is in, so that it cannot find our world itself and wreck a terrible wrath upon us all as if brutally feeds, but even so, it is made clear that summoning this creature too many times, whilst obviously damaging the very nature of the world where it walks and the cost of so many lost souls, is dangerous as that it could grasp a clear enough idea of where it is.

“One day you wake up and realize the world can be conquered.” - Doctor Impossible
Reply
03-02-2016, 07:56 AM
Post: #55
RE: Spheres of Influence
Superweapons, part 2: I just want to clarify what I'm looking for here, since I don't think I gave the right impression before. These are meant to be fantasy nukes, not helpful items. They aren't supposed to aid you at all, just shatter and destroy entire areas. If you want magic buffs for your armies, that's something you can just have from skilled mages. If you want magitech mechas or airship fleets, those are things you can easily start with basic versions of, or begin with the groundwork for and work up to throughout the game (or just copy off your rivals). Even some kind of horrible chemical weapon, used on a conventional scale would probably count as regular equipment for your armies.

Superweapons are not this. They are awe-inspiring implements of pure destruction that can strike anywhere with little warning, are expensive to create and would probably get you in trouble with Geneva should you ever actually use them. Mind you Geneva doesn't exist, but hey, there's still basic decency, concern for revenge strikes and the desire not to destroy the world worth considering. They don't have to be as inventive and original as the rest of your app, which is why I included a boring-yet-strong one in the sheet post for people who preferred a nation that was too peaceful or kind to actively develop their own unique way to slaughter thousands of people with ease.
Reply
03-03-2016, 03:32 PM (This post was last modified: 04-07-2016 02:56 PM by Protoman.)
Post: #56
RE: Spheres of Influence
Name: Amaro Zor.
Government: Confederation of six nomadic Elven tribes, each led by an ataman - a chief elected for life by the adults of the tribe. Men and women alike can serve as chief by the letter of the law, but most of the tribes have their own personal preference towards patriarchy or matriarchy. Chiefs must be of adult age, and they must be married.

Each ataman's spouse is left in the nation's only city - Amaro Zor - as the holder of that tribe's piece of the Bringer of Justice. This serves three purposes: First, to encourage the chiefs to come back to the city fairly frequently, lest they die without a legitimate child to their name. Second, to ensure that even if the tribe is detained or attacked in a foreign nation, their piece of the Bringer will not be lost. Third, to ensure that each tribe has a say in whether or not the Bringer is summoned.

Also left behind are those too old or sickly to bear one more voyage, and one third of each tribe's healthy population, that they may defend the city, spend the wealth generated on previous trips to fortify and furnish the city (on the orders of the council of spouses,) and to keep it well-maintained. This third will be cycled out on every return trip, so that the sedentary lifestyle doesn't start to get to them.

With little land of their own, each of the tribes forms a caravan and wanders through the lands of others, trading with locals and putting on performances to enrich the tribe. After the chief is satisfied with their earnings, they will typically return to Amaro Zor to enrich the city and relieve the sedentary members of the tribe from their posts. Typically they will return twice a year, though some will return more or less frequently for a variety of reasons.

Leader: Each of the tribes is lead by a different ataman. I'll be playing the leader of the Bater. The tribes and their leaders are as follows.
Bater - Matriarchy. The largest and most well-respected of the tribes, the Bater have faced as much hardship as anyone, but overcome it because of their pragmatic approach to survival. They are leed by the young Asena, a woman known for her iron-clad will, strong sense of right and wrong, and diplomatic approach to inter-tribal conflict. As the leader of Bater is the defacto leader of Amaro Zor, her age is the source of some contention among certain tribes, particularly the Karbaro. She is untested, but the people of her tribe that her stalwart nature and quick wit will lead them to glory. Her husband Quidico is a cool-headed man with a gentle disposition who faithfully serves as a councilman in Amaro Zor.

Lovoro - Matriarchy. The Lovoro survive by trade above all else. While all the tribes trade, these silver-tongued merchants have made a philosophy of it. They believe that by trading and making themselves useful they might find acceptance in the foreign lands they travel through. Led by a middle-aged woman named Maireni, who has ruled for twenty years and is known for her no-nonsense attitude. Her husband is a man named Orchilo, who is known for his by-the-book attitude and dedication to the law.

Karbaro - Patriarchy. Warriors who believe that giving off the appearance of might is the only way to dissuade persecution from outsiders. They take on a warlike persona and try their hardest to look like fearsome warriors. Their tendency to start fights has resulted in many executions that the other tribes could not justly contest, leading to heavy population decline. Their current leader is a serious and severe man named Vano. His wife is an incredibly fearsome woman named Vai who insists on defending the honor of the Amaro by any means necessary, even if it means war.

Chakano - Gender neutral. The Chakano believe the best way to maintain their independence is by endearing themselves to the common folk. Thus, they are known for their jovial attitude, colorful plays, and up-beat music. They are led by a woman named Tasarla who is known for her laid-back attitude and generally lenient enforcement of tribal rules. Her wife Tematea is an advocate for mercy in the law back in the city and frequently clashes with Orchilo.

Zuhno - Formerly gender neutral, recently patriarchical. Split from the Chakano over an ideological difference. While the Chakano believe they should endear themselves to common folk with their music, the Zuhno believe they should save their music for those with power - particularly noblemen and women. By endearing themselves to the elite, the Zuhno hope to enjoy their protection. They are led by a man named Menowin, whose pretentiousness and dedication to the 'finer things' in life is matched only by his wife Zujenia.

Society: The nation of Amaro people are primarily Elvish, though they allow other races to join the caravan should they find the lifestyle appealing. They have a vibrant musical tradition and are experienced in the ways of the accordion and violin, among various other instruments.

History: The Amaro culture is fairly old, but the country is relatively young, having been established among the tribes to ensure mutual protection as of about two-hundred years ago.

Weapon: The Bringer of Justice is an amalgamate of the spiritual energy of the Amaro who were persecuted by foreigners throughout history. When unleashed, the Bringer appears as an armored Seraph descending from on high. He hovers in the sky, raises his sword, and casts down a bright sphere of energy. Once it makes contact with the ground, it explodes, destroying all within a certain radius.
Reply
03-07-2016, 03:58 AM (This post was last modified: 03-09-2016 07:33 AM by Palamedes.)
Post: #57
RE: Spheres of Influence
Sorry for length, but this turned out to be way more detailed to explain than I planned. I might change around some things but for now I'm happy enough with what I have to post and play it.

Name: Arcavat

Government: Absolute Dictatorship under the ancient and unstoppable dragon Zo. Decades ago, Zo arrived in the citystate and destroyed the mage council that had ruled over it for centuries, instituting absolute rule under it. At first, the people were terrified and none stood up to the beast, but over time Zo proved an exceptional and able ruler, with the benevolence of a mortal and the wisdom of many.

Leader:Tyrol Harver is in fact the actual ruler of Arcavat. During a civil war amongst the mage council, his forefathers destroyed the half of the wizards who favoured the old ways to instead create a sort of elective monarchy. Having looked at rising draconic kingdoms they realized that fewer people challenge a dragon than any other monarch, and so they invented a dragon older and more powerful than any thought possible to 'defeat' them.

Tyrol is the third leader of Arcavat, and a popular ruler amongst the people - though only the mages know of his real role. An accomplished elementalist, he has captured over a dozen outsiders to fuel his power and acted for six years as the head of the Fury of Zo prior to his nomination as monarch. He spends much of his time providing magical aid to the people of the state, though since becoming leader has remained close to the city itself, primarily.

Society: Arcavat is a multicultural state made up of most of the races of the world. The society's most distinct feature is its caste system:

Tier one: Foreigners - anyone who is visiting the country or living in it for less than five years. They are treated with respect and dignity, but have little to no power or chances for advancement and their word will never beat that of a citizen on its own. Workarounds exist, however, for the rich or savvy, or any who bring something of note to the country.
Tier two: Citizens - those who live and are born in the country. Everything from typical peasants to craftsmen and merchants.
Tier three: Contributors - Those who have brought something considered to be of value to the country (mostly old world artifacts), as well as their descendants. Wealth and prestige exists for them - more or less standard nobility. Members of organized religions are included in this class as well, though typically the level of power Contributors get is reserved for the highest ranked members of any such faith.
Tier four: Marshals - High nobility, primarily those who offer great strength or resources to the nation. Typically these include leaders of independent states who have joined Zo, Contributor families of note chosen to rule over new conquests, military leaders, or powerful beings given some sort of domain (typically dragons who have sought the ancient wyrm's might and knowledge to add to their own).
Tier five: Mages - Magic users of note. This isn't, of course, all magic users within the country, just those who are officially part of the government. Any mage who signs up and can prove their loyalty and discretion typically makes it in after swearing a deadly oath to uphold the country's secret, which only they and the sixth tier know of.
Tier six: Founders - Those mages most capable of emulating the imagined might of Zo. These few dozen wizards hold all of the power of the country and are chosen by the previous title holder's nomination. Titles are, of course, Zo themselves, followed by the heads and then members of the Powers of Zo (his Voice being in charge of maintaining his illusionary voice and form, his Fury in charge of his displays of magic, his Force of his physical interactions, his Soul of maintaining his personality, and his Wisdom for keeping all the others in proper sync). Finally members of the Powers are chosen amongst the regular mages of the country. Of course nepotism is common, given the fact that a founder chooses their own successor, but there is still room for meritocracy given specific rules within the system (like being unable to pass your title down to a relative).

Being a magic heavy nation, all forms of magic are practiced, but by far the most common kind is symbiote magic. It is also known as familiar magic, colour magic, and, more critically, borrowed magic and parasitic magic. It is not a magic learned as one instead gains their powers from outsiders, either through bargain or force. Upon doing so, the outsider becomes part of the mage, represented by an intricate design on their skin. It is one of the most powerful forms of magic, given its direct link to magical beings and said beings' vast array of different magical abilities, as well as one of the easiest to learn for those races or individuals lacking the natural ability. That said, it is also unpredictable and dangerous given the differing power levels and hostility of outsiders, not to mention it is also difficult to find outsiders in the first place. Many who try don't manage to ever bind even two outsiders, but those who do usually have a much easier time gaining more.

Religious tolerance is enforced as strictly as racial tolerance, but by far the most popular faith is Ancient - the belief that the godliness is achieved through existence. Namely, this means that what is very old has ascended to godhood, hence why beings like Zo are all powerful. Though most regular gods are included in the Ancient Pantheon, believed to be beings that no longer interact with the world, those that are known to physically exist are treated with the greatest reverence. Ironically, Ancient followers are amongst the few who are dissatisfied with the high position of mages in society, believing them to be pretenders to the power of the gods.

Given its smaller size but larger population, the country is extremely based on an idea of quality over quantity. Refining goods is more common than producing them, and only the most valuable or tradeable ores are mined from the surrounding mountains. This also translates to the military, which utilizes exceptional training, the natural defenses surrounding Arcavat, and ancient Mourning Wargolems instead of vast numbers.

History: Arcavat was founded centuries ago when a group of independent mages and scholars discovered a library - one from the Golden Age itself. Within the massive structure's walls lied the secrets and histories of the ancients, and the intellectuals immediately took the library for themselves. After all, who else would you trust such a valuable resource too? Certainly any barbarous adventurer to find it would simply pilfer and loot whatever gold was in there and let the books burn.

For the next few decades Arcavat wasn't much of a country as much as it was those scholars bringing in family and hired help to delve deeper into the library - taking so long due to both the extensive damage time and decay had wrought as well as the various traps and defenses still active. The beginnings of a civilization only came to bear because of the need to keep well supplied and to defend themselves from other intellectuals or rulers eager to take their newfound knowledge for themselves.

The biggest leap forward happened when the archivists discovered more than texts - later rooms began to have more and more of the ancient technology used to conquer the world. Storerooms of gold and rare materials, blueprints, and even some of the ancient golems and weapons thought lost. Though not all of these would be understood or used until much later, it gave Arcavat the ability to not only defend itself, but expand and grow over a small area, encompassing several nearby villages.

Fast forward and the small city-state has grown even further. Though it never pushed its borders much past where it had before due to the array of rivals around them and a lack of any sort of superweapon, a high standard of living and defences both natural and discovered had brought droves of people to turn the excavation colony and villages into towns and cities. Trade flourished, both from luxury goods and the rich mountains surrounding the state. None dared attack Arcavat conventionally and face their small but elite army, and none would bear any greater power knowing how rivals might react to such a bold play for the nation's secrets.

However, dissent was rising, slowly but surely. People questioned why mages were the only ones allowed into the ruling council, why they tolerated unpopular races (often allowed for their usefulness intellectually or as cheap labour), and many other minor qualms. The council had become bloated and opulent, ineffective at handling it all adequately and many feared revolution.

The mages split between various factions, but only the two most radical remained - the Monarchists and Restorationists. Both purged the decadent councilmen and their useless bureaucracy, but believed respectively in continuing mage rule under a single unstoppable leader and in reforming a council made by all great contributers to Arcavat, not just mages. The war raged on for only a short time and few outside ever knew, with the Restorationists taking early victories and securing the vast majority of the mage tower, the fortress overlooking the library that all the council resided in.

The Monarchists, needing to turn things around, came up with a horrible plan. Sacrificing many of their numbers, they took control of the tower's foundations and exit. From there it was a simple matter of allowing some of their best and brightest to hide around key points to sabotage the structure while the others distracted the Restorationists with a desperate attack, being predictably routed and forced into retreat.

The Restorationists celebrated their victory, but weren't aware of what was coming. The Monarchists, upon being forced from the tower, created Zo, a massive dragon from before the fall who had finally decided to take what was his. The saboteurs made the ultimate sacrifice then, and to all but the surviving mages it seemed that Zo destroyed the tower and all inside with a single vicious attack.

In the decades following dissent has dropped to an all time low and the archive was finally fully explored, revealing a secret powerful enough to allow Arcavat to finally become the world power it always could have been.

Weapon: The Dun'ndoon, greatest and most terrible creation of the Golden Age, found in the deepest depths of the Arcavat library. In one existence where the various doomsday weapons of the world were allowed to rot or be lost instead of ever activated, scientists would eventually unearth the device and discover its true nature - classifying it as a Quantum Annihilator. When fed a specific circumstance and event, the Dun'ndoon is capable of internally moving backwards through time to alter it irreversibly, resulting in it pulling the world into a separate universe where whatever the event shaped never existed. With it one can wipe out entire cities, countries, or even races from time itself, and even change small parts of history completely. Unfortunately, it is unable to alter memories of the original timeline it splits from, so all know what they have lost in the most horrible way. These scientists also theorize that, if used regularly and in tandem with massive destructive and/or magical power, the devices carefully designed safeties could be accidentally overwritten, destroying the timeline itself. No wonder it was buried so deep and so well.

Unfortunately, all that the mages of Arcavat know of is the device's terrible powers and how they could use it to cement their power. For them, it can take anywhere from a week to a couple of months to pour through the great archive to figure out the exact trigger for whatever they want to annihilate and calibrate the device to remove it. Six to eight individual triggers can be pre-programmed into the Dun'ndoon at once, but once they are they can be activated instantly. Just about anything can be wiped out, but small scale attacks and extremely massive ones could take up more room or even be beyond the mages' ability to prepare.
Reply
03-07-2016, 07:02 PM (This post was last modified: 03-07-2016 10:36 PM by MedicInDisquise.)
Post: #58
RE: Spheres of Influence
Name: Valrin Trade Kingdom

Government: The Kingdom is ruled over by the King; traditionally descended from the initial Firniski that is important in the Kingdom's history. He can be influenced in court, and bribing (usually by successful caravans and adventurers) is considered a normal, and traditional part of a meeting with the king.

Leader: Trader-King Firniski VII, with his heirs Firniski VIII and VIV. He takes his name from the mythical trader in history. He can be influenced and convinced to perform actions in his court, where he hears out anyone with enough money.

Society: The permanent citizens are often Valrit, with some sedentary Sarin who settle down. Many other different species go in and out due to the nature of the nation, although the biggest number of immigrants and emigrants is Sarin who pick up and sell items from the kingdom and head back out in caravans. Due to the the Valrit's and Sarin's hardiness and drive to wander, they make excellent traders.

History: A relatively young country, who came into power many generations ago. The trader Firniski, now thought to be a mythical being who decided to mess with mortals, came to the Kingdom a long time ago when it was still a fragment of the empire and mostly human, elf, and dwarf. Right before the trader stepped foot in the kingdom, the king felt extremely odd, apathetic, and unable to resist anything said to him by his underlings. The trader, a Valrit of Firniski, came up and offered a great and now infamous deal; 3 copper coins in exchange for the entire kingdom. The king was then outcast, and Firniski the First started to rule over it. It was said he died at the very end of the Age of Formless Torment. Firniski II was then put into power, and he helped build the kingdom to what it was now. It should be noted the Kingdom is still quite small, with the kingdom only having one city. What it doesn't have in military power and conquest is excellent trade possibilities and money.

Weapon: Of course, how Firniski managed to make the deal is known; he had a great staff in his backpack that shined brightly. This great staff, named Firn after him, is an extremely powerful staff that can level a city. It is now known that the staff was stolen by the 'mythical' Firniski and used to threaten the king. He was cast out by the King, but he left a threat that he made good on; as the date came closer for him to come back, the king became despondent, apathetic, and simply waited in despair. When Firniski came, the king was ready to agree to ANY deal that would end in his and his kingdom's survival.

The staff's effects itself is that it maddens the people within radius, which most likely included the caster. The maddened people would then start killing each other and tearing everything down, having no restrictions and extremely angered. Once they begin to calm down, destroying everything they can, they then die suddenly, dropping on the floor calmly.
Reply
03-08-2016, 08:28 PM (This post was last modified: 07-16-2016 01:09 PM by Anomaly.)
Post: #59
RE: Spheres of Influence
Name: The Necrocracy of Strasidel

Government: Dictatorship. Mortemia's rule is eternal.

Leader: Mortemia, a dracolich of, until fairly recently, very little prominence. And before that, a dragon of even less prominence, but of great ambition (and with the less ridiculous name of Nilanthi). She spent a great many centuries of her life delving deeper and deeper into the secrets of necromancy, distancing himself more and more from anyone she might have been close to. Though the lifespans of dragons are near-limitless as it stands, this was not enough for Mortemia - only as a lich would she truly be eternal, not to mention able to command the dead. All of the dead. Mortemia seeks no less than to control death itself, a fact she doesn’t really bother to hide at all.

She’s actually surprisingly friendly, all things considered - for someone with a skull for a face, at least.

Society: The majority of the Necrocracy is made up of strictly stratified castes of the undead, of various varieties. At the bottom, of course, are the undead of little intelligence - animate skeletons, zombies, ghouls, and other similar things. Generally these are just used for cheap labor, or as cannon fodder in conflicts. Above those come the vengeful dead - singleminded ghosts and the like who remain in the realm of the living to complete unfinished, and often violent, business. They have no real place in society, but have to at least be kept in check within the Necrocracy. Outside, Mortemia takes no responsibility for their actions. Next are common intelligent undead, those able to think for themselves and exist in some dark mockery of a civilized society. Most of these have fairly forsaken an afterlife in favor of an eternal half-life in the Necrocracy. It’s best not to ask them why.

The highest in Necrocracy are liches - powerful, truly immortal undead who have ripped their souls from their bodies and bound them eternally to the mortal plane. There are, of course, very few liches, and Mortemia herself strictly regulates their creation. After all, some would be foolish enough to challenge her absolute rule, if left unchecked.

This leaves out the non-undead citizens of Strasidel, of course. They do, in fact, exist, though most tend to live in small towns on the outskirts with lower undead populations. The living are usually considered somewhere slightly beneath intelligent undead in societal ranking. Living people of most races can be found in the Necrocracy, save for those deterred by the harshly cold climate. There are even a few dragons living within its borders, though dragons are strictly prohibited from becoming liches. You know, for some reason.

Strasidel is also known for its surprisingly nice retirement communities.

History: The Necrocracy began as nothing but a harsh, desolate land, dotted with small city-states and the occasional wandering tribe of Sarin or enclave of Nurkum. More importantly, though, these lands sat atop a veritable fountain of necromantic energy, a nexus of fell power left over from some age long since stricken from history books. This is what brought Mortemia to reside in these lands, taking over a particularly large cave network inhabited by a large Nurkum population. Needless to say, those that survived the conflict managed to convince themselves that the takeover was the will of the Undergod. Those that didn’t became Mortemia’s first laborers.

Over the decades, rumors rapidly spread outward of horrors deep within the fell lands in the north, of skeletons marching in rank and file, of entire towns wiped out by the chattering hordes. Rumors quickly became reality, as Mortemia spread her influence further and further, filling the lands of Strasidel with undead of all sorts as tribes and city-states fell to her.

Eventually she realized that, as her skeletal influence spread through the land, the surrounding, better-established nations would probably get nervous. So instead she turned to improving infrastructure, building up a proper (and mostly dead) society, and even incorporating the living properly into the Necrocracy. For what it was, the Necrocracy wasn’t a completely terrible place to live - as long as you stayed where it was safe to draw breath. For those pledge to become undead after their deaths (or even before), it could be downright pleasant at times.

Most of the unpopulation of the Necrocracy is centered near its capital of Tezentel, with a few other mainly-undead towns scattered across the scarred and dead lands of Strasidel. Towns of the living are usually located close to the borders, where winters are less harsh and agriculture is possible - though magic is somewhat less potent.

Weapon: The Intercontinental Ballistic Reanimator (ICBR) - an enormous missile inscribed with all manner of complex runes, at least most of which serve some important purpose in maintaining the rocket’s stability. The rocket’s warhead consists of a volatile crystal sphere charged over the course of weeks with potent necromantic spells, and magically suspended in the exact center of its containment chamber. Just before impact with its target, the crystal is crushed inward by force runes from all sides, critically compressing it and releasing all of the magic stored within at once. The surge of necromantic energy decimates an entire city, killing every living thing inside and reanimating their skeletons as mindless, malevolent undead.

In short, it’s a nuke that turns everyone in a city into evil skeletons. And their little dogs, too.
Reply
03-10-2016, 08:39 AM (This post was last modified: 03-10-2016 08:41 AM by Galloglasses.)
Post: #60
RE: Spheres of Influence
Name: Herinhia

Government: The government is ruled by a Chamber of the Orders who then elect from amongst their number the Outremarian, the King of Paladins. Each Crusader Order of knights has a set number of seats to share amongst themselves, often newer orders only permitted access when one order's number dwindles enough to allow the room. Over the centuries, the Four original founding orders have dwindled so much to the point that now fourteen knightly orders make up the Chamber. No Outremarian is allowed to nominate a successor and the son of an Outremarian being chosen to succeed his father is rare in the extreme. Upon being chosen, the Outremarian strips himself of the cloak of his order and adopts the Outremarian Grey, the colour of the Outremic Guard, who protect the Outremic household and often comprise the foremost spell blades in the entire Kingdom. Like any other kingdom with divided powers, where the majority of power lies within the kingdom has shifted between the throne and the Chamber throughout the centuries. Politics is all the same, it seems.

Leader: Outremarian Justinianus is a young, friendly man. Genial and good natured. Chosen from among the smaller orders within the Chamber, he is charismatic and a deft negotiator, likely the key reasons behind his recent ascension to the Grey.

Society: While the majority of the Population consists of the races of Mankind, Herinhia is a fairly cosmopolitan society with a broad representation. A martial society by tradition, warrior culture is respected on par with wizardry. Given the ruling class of society are Paladins who are, to a man, spell blades by trade, this is not very surprising.

Each order is representative of a different contributing culture to Herinthian society, and typically each order keeps its traditional aesthetic even though Herinthian society has had a long time to amalgamate. While each order may favour one god over another, the kingdom has a shared pantheon and knightly orders are distinguished more for the school of magic they specialize in, with each school typically having a dual nature, than in sectarian squabbling.

The dual nature of the national character results in the exportation of adventurers and the occasional mercenary band, often loaning out cohorts of Paladins to neighbouring lords and nations for one issue or another. Second only to the spell blade is the profession of the farmer, given that the land the kingdom now occupies was little more than blasted wastes, centuries of magical terraforming and honest hard work after the crusade to conquer it has turned it into a lush and verdant land.

Perhaps too much so, Herinhia is currently witnessing a population explosion.

History: The Herinhian crusade was a colossal effort on the part of many heroes raising armies and marching into the Black Lands to make war with the Lost King and his legions of Blackness.

It was a success. End of story. Move along.

Weapon: Golemgeddon. Deep under the kingdom at unknown locations the Knights found vast stores containing uncountably vast legions of hollow, inanimate golem constructs, made from strange metals and ores, humming with strange power and lost magics. Through centuries of research and experimentation, the kingdom learned how to utilise this weapon effectively, even if the greater understanding of the magic that underlies the weapon is still not fully comprehended.

Bypassing shielding, the kingdom can, once activated, teleport devastating numbers of these golem warriors right into the hearts of their enemies' cities near instantaneously wrecking untold devastation for a time before the spell wears off and the golems are resummoned back to their holdings, often having to wait indeterminate lengths of time before that particular group of golems could be used again while they self repair.

The golems are uncontrollable once activated upon an area and will kill and destroy indiscriminatingly.

Reply
03-10-2016, 11:02 AM
Post: #61
RE: Spheres of Influence
Alright, that's the end of the player apps! I'll work out who's in (and finally post the details of the magic system) soon, but first, let's move onto the last stage of worldbuilding!

This time it's the little things, rather than the big. NPC countries, famous landmarks, sites of significant events or geographical features, interesting tidbits and just about any other miscellanea you could think of. No forms, no specifications, just pure, delicious fluff. Have at it!
Reply
03-10-2016, 05:14 PM
Post: #62
RE: Spheres of Influence
An island with a volcano in the middle of it floats by the coast on a set timer. The Volcano has came to the coast during the current time period, along with the empire who lives on it. How has the world changed since the nation last came to the mainland, back during the Age of Formless Torment? The moving Island/Volcano is named Gizarth, and the kingdom is named Gizarth Kingdom.
Reply
03-11-2016, 12:24 AM (This post was last modified: 03-11-2016 06:36 AM by Bramzter.)
Post: #63
RE: Spheres of Influence
'Famous landmarks of The Witch-Realm' by Agonos Kánth of the scholars order

In the eyes of most the 'Witch-Realm' in the mountains of Andúr is dismissed as a desolate and 'evil' place and with the roaming dire tribes and the magically corrupted countryside there is some grain of truth to it, Yet the lands are a wealth for scholars such as myself for the lands around the Andúr mountains are rich with ruins and places that give insight into history of the world.. And with all the danger around it is never dull for the bodyguards too! I have made a list here of the various landmarks that might be interesting to the order.

- The Old Great North-South Road -
One of the first remnants of the suspected greater empire Andúr was a supposed part off. The road itself was paved with quality stonework foreign to the region although overgrown and loose and slightly unusable the road stretches a good way out into the Witchrealm.. only stopping close to the capital where the road has been curiously rebuilt with metallic plate.

- The Witch Fog -
This curious anomaly drifts around the heart of the witch realm. It is magical in nature yet its properties are still not defined. It is believed that the curse that fell unto Andúr manifested itself in the place the Witch Fog now lies even the dire men avoid this place. Studying the fog might lead to interesting results but i suspect it is dangerous. Curious floating lights and green-blue crystalline features can be seen within the mist.

- The Rauthúrian Moot -
This large ruin on the central hills is a important historical location to the former Hill-men of Andúr. It was here where the clan's gathered and it became the seat of the short lived Unified Rauthúrian Nation. The ruin is littered with interesting antiques such as coins, swords and other artifacts. Under the ruins there is a large burrow where it is said the clan chiefs are laid to rest. There is something unnerving about the place however.. but i am sure it is nothing particularly troubling.

- The Grimberg -
A ancient yet minor Kethúl mining outpost, securely built within the Andúr mountains. The local culture is slightly different then the usual Kethúl social standards, The animosity between the two tribes is considerably more mellow then normal, there is no urban segregation for instance. perhaps living in such hostile conditions make it impossible for such rivalries to develop. The Kethúl of the Grimberg are also considerably more moody and reclusive then others and refused to answer any questions regarding the mountain nor the reason the signs of heavy industry are prevalent there

- Carack Dolthúr -
The Capital of Andúr watches over the hills and mountains at the end of the North-South Road. It is here where most of the original inhabitants of Andúr make their living after the fall of Rauthúria and the influx of Dire Men driven from neighboring nations. The fortress city is well fortified and has a good infrastructure in comparison with the many other ruins within the region. Lots of the local culture is passed down orally but yet a few scriptures remain for study. The inhabitants were distrustful but welcomed us regardless due to their traditions. The city itself is dominated by the tower in the middle, which can be seen from the borders itself. There seem to be caverns underneath the city not accessible by our group, Could they connect to Grimberg?

- The Stewards Tower -
The living place of the mysterious Wizard Pestádir. Its blakend and hardend stone exterior is imposing as are its armored guards and mysterious robed figures moving within the windows... Sometimes the windows light up with a strange white light.. the whole thing is quite disconcerting


The Clans of Andúr and Rauthúria by Agonos Kánth of the scholars order

In my travels trough the 'Witch-Realm' i had focused my study mostly upon the history of this wicked land, Especially the history of the Hillmen. I uncovered that the clans of old were particularly important in their culture and although the clans have intermingled to the point obscurity in the years living together i was surprised to hear the locals have tried to imprint their clans teachings the dire tribes living within the hills with a surprising if meager success. I have made a summery of the different clans down below for the sake of preserving the information.

Draig-lûth (Dragon Clan)
The dragon clan was one of the most reviled clans of Andúr, Little more then a band of raiders they believed in a might makes right philosophy and frequently raided other clans. The largest reason why they were so reviled was because they worshiped a dragon who lived within the mountain, turning their back upon the more traditional fates. They however quickly disbanded into petty raiders and thugs after the dragon was slain by adventurers and they no longer had its protection.

Hebog-lûth (Falcon-Clan)
The Falcon clan lived in a secure inlet in the mountains using a old ruin as their base. Safe from raids and threats of other clans they opposed the unification of the clans, for suspicions that a outside influence was playing them all for fools they secretly sent word to the empire on their promise of collaboration. When the soldier arrived The Falcon Clan had them help to prepare their inlet for a invasion by having them help with making armor and collecting poison toad glands and laying traps.. only to betray them once all the work was finished and join the other clans with their unjust rewards.

The Falcon clan escaped their retribution at the hands of the empire by fleeing into the underground caves after the empire attacked their base, killing their prisoners and gloating on the other side of a gap about how they tricked their soldiers. They eventually arrived within Carack Dolthúr

Turch-lûth (Boar-Clan)
The Boar Clan was fiercely defensive of their independence both from outside forces as well as other clans, They were considered the most moral of the clans and thus usually was the one who managed to unite other clans in mutual cooperation and was usually a mediator between disputes.

Unfortunately the lands belonging to the clan were the site of were the mega spell impacted. only a few members of the Boar Clan escape. Either finding refuge in the swamps of the Lizard Clan or being put to work in servitude to the Ox Clan and subsequently escaping in a raid by the Lizard Clan. The remnants of the Boar clan made their home within Carack Dolthúr as one of its first citizens. Practicing a lifestyle of forgiveness as Rauthúria fell.

Uch-lûth (Ox-Clan)
The Ox clan was the largest clan around, possessing much lands and herds. The clan prided itself on their mercantile tradition and their tradition of holding grand auctions...They were the one who made the deal with the Kethúl of Grimberg and gave Rauthúria much more a fighting chance agianst the empire. However they were plagued have lots of internal strife, causing them to work against their own decisions. Corruption and dissent were rampant and the leaders made a lot of decisions the citizens weren't all to supportive of. Several Ox clan holdings revolted against their leaders and began to seek forgiveness for their actions against other clans. As time wore on they slowly lost their holdings to the wilds and the dire men and eventually migrated to Carack Dolthúr

Caru-lûth (Stag-Clan)
A small clan, pushed to the less fertile outskirts of Rauthúria by the Dragon Clan's early aggression they were the more scholarly and religiously inclined. Worshiping the Huntsman of the forests and holding great festivals to recount the history of the people of Andúr. Their relative undesirable position meant they were not hurt that much by the empire's crushing of Rauthúria. They were however visited by Pestádir and his followers and their mutual intrest in scholarly and the search for knowledge ensured that they were among the few that were invited the live within Carack Dolthúr instead of fleeing to it.

Avanc-lûth (Lizard-Clan)
The Lizard clan were isolationists who survived in the rain soaked parts of Rauthúria and Andúr. They were expert in quick and methodical strikes but slow to involve themselves in matters greater then themselves. They reluctantly sheltered the remnants of the boar clan and were persuaded by envy and a sense of dread to attack the Ox Clan. They were one of the few that did not join the war for Rauthúria and were one of the last to enter Carack Dolthúr due to being displaced by dire men.

Deivlig (Oathbreakers)
Hill-men outcast from the various tribes that were under a oath to watch over the barrows and tombs in penance. However during the war between the Empire and Rauthúria they feeling no true loyalty to the clans defiled and plundered the tombs and tried to buy their way into the empire's good graces and were rewarded greatly... however they discovered far too late they could no longer find rest after death slowly becoming shades of their once living self. No one knows if it was because of the oath or the residual magic of the mega spell that caused it. Most however had made the passage to some unknown realm rumored to be full of undead yet still some remain calling themselves the Ruthless Deivlig, The barrows are avoided now, for the unrepentant death will not suffer the living passage..
Reply
03-11-2016, 02:12 PM
Post: #64
RE: Spheres of Influence
Alright, so as promised, here are the ten players.
  • Kalvesiya, the absolutist dragon-led Tsardom of the underdeveloped frosty expanses!
  • The Eorelan Republic, eternally seeking a renaissance of their classical origins!
  • The Republic of Wheatvale, the upstanding state of unassuming farmers!
  • Andúr, the witch-realm, lying in the shadow of Morthguárdain, the obsidian tower!
  • Teór Aradel, a land of settlers and outcasts in the shadow of its namesake mountain!
  • Rudahog, the dark dictatorship of the downtrodden, ruled by a villainous clique!
  • Amaro Zor, the nomads and wanderers who roam the lands of other countries!
  • Arcavat, the magocratic city-state that is absolutely definitely ruled by a dragon!
  • Strasidel, the land of the walking dead, an abomination against all that is good and holy!
  • Herinhia, the military-led crusader state, ruled by the noble paladin orders!

Stay tuned for the bizarre and mysterious phenomenon known as magic, and keep your own input coming! This is your last chance to give worldbuilding input before the game begins, so make the most of it!
Reply
03-11-2016, 07:12 PM
Post: #65
RE: Spheres of Influence
Travelers be weary of the Great Desert, which exists to the west of the world. The Great Desert is simply a large desert, inhabited by small kingdoms and tribes. There is nothing to be gained there, and nearly no food or water to sustain large amounts of people. It is one of the last places that has ruins and Archaeological spots dated back to the Golden Age. However, deadly creatures created to thrive in the desert roam there as well. It is not unheard of to have entire military operations to fight against these beasts at the worse.
Reply
03-12-2016, 05:35 AM
Post: #66
RE: Spheres of Influence
Tales of the reclusive kingdom, Teralon, are many and varied. Bordered on three sides by mountains and on a fourth by an expansive bog, the lush valley of Teralon has long been the envy of neighbouring kingdoms. Few are the rulers who have dared to assault the impregnable walls of Teralon's mountain citadels, and none have ever brought an army to bear against the walls of its fair capital, which sits at the center of the valley like a gleaming jewel, a single slender spire rising above the royal palace.

Even so, Teralon holds dominion of only a small piece of land, and has long been known to distance itself from the world at large, turning away all but a few select traders who prove able to earn the trust of the kingdom's xenophobic inhabitants.

In recent years, the kingdom has seen a revival of the belief in the Old Faith - a set of complex principles all centered around knowing ones place in relation to the god-being known as Nesariet, often depicted as a great serpent large enough to encircle entire mountains within her great girth, though the dogmatic beliefs of the Old Faith would have its believers know that such is the least of her powers. Most of the tenets of the Faith involve taking pride only in doing ones lifeworth well, that the fruits of ones labor might benefit Nesariet. Thus, occupations better favored by Nesariet allows the individual to command greater respect, while individuals of a useless occupation - or those of no occupation at all - are viewed as little better than animals.

More popular, however, are tales of Teralon's most recent king, an aging man with an exaggerated reputation, who is speculated to have the power to call fire and lightning, or to commune with demons, or even that he seeks the secret knowledge of true immortality for his own gain.

But then, it is the nature of folk to make up stories about things they do not understand.


---


Some ancient tales tell of the Seléis de Karán, a legendary galleon that was supposedly hewn from a single piece of solid obsidian and empowered by some dark sorcery to cut through the ocean. Supposedly, the ship was crewed by only a single man, his name lost to history, driving the ship through the seas by mere force of will, one eye an empty socket, the other inset with an eye of ruby that let him see all that was before him.

In most tales, the Seléis appears from amidst the fury of only the darkest storms, the baleful eye of its captain shining clearly amidst the darkness as the Seléis closes in on the helpless sailors lost at sea, ruthlessly smashing their ship to bits amidst the churning storm, leaving them to drown.

Of course, such tales never mention how the story could then have survived for others to retell, and more worldly sailors are quick to dismiss it as a mere fable.
Reply
03-13-2016, 02:57 PM
Post: #67
RE: Spheres of Influence
The tale of Greensleeves

Once there was a man with a family of three, just his wife and child, happy as should be. He made his trade trapping small critters and beasts, and cutting down trees, oaks and evergreens, whistling a song taught by his gran, of older days when beasts talked to man. One day he came across a hawthorn alone, up on a hill, waiting for summer to come. "Fine kindling it'll be." grinning said he, as he took up his axe, to prepare for the task. Just like he'd done with so many before, he hacked, chopped and hewed it to the floor, and then cut it into many bits more. As he slashed down with great force, a splinter jumped free, a yell most course, echoed through the trees. His sleeves turned to red, no longer green, the hawthorn claimed vengeance, bitter it seemed. The man fell, alone on the hill, never to rise, as death he did feel, but that was not so, new life was born, a creature of green, grown from his bones. Greensleeves arose, both young and old, a spirit of reprisal for viridian brood. In darkness he strides, silent, for his size, except for his whistle, of wood and bristle.

That was a lot of work for a shitty poet

“One day you wake up and realize the world can be conquered.” - Doctor Impossible
Reply
03-14-2016, 10:25 AM (This post was last modified: 03-14-2016 10:27 AM by Vancho1.)
Post: #68
RE: Spheres of Influence
[Image: azbukion.png]

terrible font if you want to write your own eorelan!

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
03-14-2016, 11:11 AM
Post: #69
RE: Spheres of Influence
Well, that's going all over the map.
Reply
03-16-2016, 11:10 AM (This post was last modified: 03-16-2016 11:13 AM by Bramzter.)
Post: #70
RE: Spheres of Influence
At the coast of the Bitter Sea travelers are advised to follow the road into the west, but never follow to the go south into the Emerald Outlands for the trees grow dense and foreign, the animals wondrous and fierce and the land feels closer to the sun with every step. Only few enter and fewer even return but those that do bring with them a great bounty of strange fruits, dried leaves, strange plants and sometimes even gold. They tell unsettling tales of stone cities of pyramids that reach above the canopy into the sky, feathered man-demons that bore weapons made from the blacked sharp earth that may surely come from the most deepest hell and strange and ruthless rituals to their sky gods..

Nobody really is sure what exactly is on the highest points on the pyramids..and exactly what they are worshiping up there.
Reply
03-16-2016, 11:34 AM
Post: #71
RE: Spheres of Influence
There are stories of a floating island that seems to always be moving across the landscape below. Supposedly, it is never seen in the same place twice. Despite this, there are those who would claim to have set foot upon the island, telling tales of a lone mansion found amidst the isle, with quiet sandstone halls and pools of clear water, and the silent lord at the heart of the mansion, searching for something that could not be found.

Regardless of the validity of these tales, those men who would speak of this have been known to seem somewhat less themselves, as if possessed by a will not quite their own.
Reply
03-19-2016, 02:04 PM
Post: #72
RE: Spheres of Influence
It is commonly assumed that dragons never get sick, but that assumption is false with the existence of the Draconic Diseases. Something between a curse and a common germ, Draconic Diseases target only dragons, often with spectacularly potent and incredibly debilitating symptoms for the victim.

Dragons rarely contract the disease due to its rarity but when they do, the chances of recovery are nigh-impossible - incurable even by chemical or arcane means. There are desperate rumors that such Diseases can be cured with outsider intervention - whether a miracle from a God or an insidious contract with a Thaldrimm - but it remains to be proven if the solution holds.

The most infamous and humiliating of such Draconic Diseases is the Lessening. When the Lessening takes hold of a dragon, their end is slow but absolute. Their scales slough off, their musculature shrinks, their arcane potential fizzles away. Any draconic trappings - whether horn, wingspan, or claw - is shedded and lost as the dragon slowly transforms into a creature that is alive but incredibly diminished and insulting to their former draconic glory. Most common final forms include lizards and vermin. Other creatures and mortals could be possible, if the dragon is fortunate, although the end-result loses a lot of magic and power of their former form.
Reply
03-20-2016, 01:46 PM (This post was last modified: 03-20-2016 01:48 PM by Acolyte Doctor.)
Post: #73
RE: Spheres of Influence
Miscellaneous Kingdoms From Distant Lands

Spinekeep Enclave - a densely populated hive of scum and villainy whose sad excuse for order is ruled by iron-fisted merchant-princes. The people there fervently worship dragons as gods and their prophecies hold that one day, a dragon will come and solve all their woes, which number in plenty. Unfortunately, for would be draconic imperialists, their definition of dragon is quite...bizarre for a lack of terms.

Orchidborn Kingdom - what looks like a lush and beautiful forest is in fact, numerous trees carefully cultivated into intricate houses and castles by the mysterious circle of green-skinned druids who call themselves the "Children of the Orchid" - otherwise informally known as "Orcs" in common mercenary lingo. The Kingdom is populated by dangerous wildlife, some of them are known to have humanoid or beyond-level intelligence.

Belly Of The Beast
- a wasteland wedged in the massive ribcage of a long-dead monster. It is infamous for its unmercifully harsh environment; it is hot and bone-dry most of the time, and what passes for weather comes in torrents of toxins and all-consuming acids. It is populated by nomads and marauding raiders - although there is persistent rumors that a legendary Dire Man called "Furoremax" wanders here.
Reply
03-21-2016, 05:20 AM
Post: #74
RE: Spheres of Influence
On Calendars and Timekeeping - A Guide to Time and its Representations

Anyone living today must of course know that our world changes with time, and that in nature there exist things which are periodic, that is to say they repeat. The cycles of the moon, the rising and setting of the sun, and the endless progression of the four seasons, from spring to summer to autumn to winter, all give definition to the passing of time.

It is generally accepted that our solar days, measured from one high noon to the next, can be divided into twenty-four hours of sixty minutes, each of sixty seconds. How this system emerged is unknown to modern historians, however, what is certain is that the twenty-four hour day and the subdivision of sixty is very old, dating back to the earliest civilizations on our world.

The division of the year is less agreed-upon, however. Current astronomical measurements give the length of the year as around three-hundred and sixty solar days, and this has led to two solar calendars.

The first, popular in the Eorelan republic, subdivides the year into twelve months of thirty days, such that three months each form a season together. The start of the year is the first day of spring, as that is considered the time when the world renews itself. The second comes from the hot regions of Istan, where the seasons are less well-defined. There, they prefer to see the year as six months of sixty days, creating a sort of symmetry which is aesthetically pleasing to the Lushedi who rule those realms.

There is also the lunar calendar, which does not hold to the concept of the year. Instead, time is measured in cycles of the moon, and each cycle from full moon to full moon represents a month. This calendar does not align well with the more popular solar ones, but it is an important feature of some cultures and religions.


Now, let us turn our attention to the numbering of the years. Most people can agree that we entered a new era at the end of the Great Torment. Thus, we measure years After the Torment, or A.T. Historical events which are said to have occurred during the formless torment are given the designation During Torment, or D.T., and events which were during the Golden Age are called G.A.

The Eorelans use a slightly reckoning of the years. They divide time into two portions, related to the ascension of their God-King into heaven near the end of the Golden Age. Since we do not know exactly how long the Formless Torment lasted, and when this supposed ascension occurred, the Eorelans' calendar has rather arbitrarily chosen some point before the end of the Torment, based on their mythic histories. Whether or not it is truly that year is a question for the philosophers and historians. Years during the mythic reign are called BA, while our current era is AA.

In the next chapter, we shall discuss the naming of the months and the subdivisions of the months themselves. This is a fascinating topic and here we can see the many cultural differences....

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
03-22-2016, 07:49 PM
Post: #75
RE: Spheres of Influence
Miscellaneous oddities

The Monolith

Located in the middle of an especially remote part of an already remote desert, no one is really quite sure who built the Monolith, or why. The obelisk-like structure is nearly half a mile tall, hundreds of feet around, and made of a hard, granite-like rock that has proved very tough to damage. Some who see the Monolith are drawn toward it for reasons unclear even to them - some of these people are never heard from again, nothing found save for occasional charred patches near the structure. Oddly enough, the Monolith doesn’t typically detect as magical at all. Travelers are advised to stay clear.

The “Grotesque Men”

A rather rare (and unfortunate) phenomenon, the “Grotesque Men” (as they’re often called) are small, gremlin-like creatures, looking fairly like small, twisted version of the various races of the world. Grotesque Men generally appear to people to live alone or who are otherwise frequently isolated, and do their best to make occasionally-deadly mischief. It’s unclear what attracts them, but they are very difficult to get rid of.

The Sea Witch

A seldom-seen oddity, the “Sea Witch” is what looks to be an ordinary human woman, save for the fact that she lives exclusively on the ocean floor, among the wrecks of ships. She’s said to be a powerful, ancient witch, cursed to forever wander the ocean in solitude. The Witch is mostly the subject of myth, with modern sightings very few and far between. As far as anyone knows, she’s harmless, trapped deep beneath the sea, but on the other hand, she does live among shipwrecks...
Reply
03-23-2016, 12:02 PM
Post: #76
RE: Spheres of Influence
At this point, the topographical map is complete, so no more major landforms please. Landmarks, NPC countries and lore are all still welcome.
Reply
03-23-2016, 05:28 PM (This post was last modified: 03-24-2016 04:37 AM by Demonsul.)
Post: #77
RE: Spheres of Influence
Henrik von Habermaus
Magic: Scrutinizing the Inscrutable
Extract from Chapter 2.

"[...]Indeed, magic itself seems a force which seems to inherently disobey the physical laws that everything in the material world are subjected to, and as such it can only be assumed that it is not a force of this world at all. Magic after all comes naturally to those creatures from beyond the tattered veil, and many ways of acquiring magic by mortal means require serious and sustained contact with such outsiders. From this, we can determine that most magic is not native to our physical world, though considering how deeply it permeates it, it is difficult to claim that all magic is otherworldly in origin. Indeed, most forms of borrowed magic clearly are, but natural magic in particular seems tied to our world, and the arcane school can then be assumed to be tied similarly to all worlds, or perhaps be considered transcendent of the veil entirely.

The later chapters in this book will focus on these individual types of magic; natural, arcane, pact and conduit. There are many subtypes of these kinds, as they fill different niches in the magical system, and frequently do not interact directly with each other - notable instances where they do will be covered towards the end of this book.

Natural magic is magic inherent - in the land, in people, or in things. It is by far the easiest to use, as it represents inherent abilities. The most obvious example would be dragons, gifted as they are with natural magic to allow them to use their breath as a weapon. Similar natural magic is evident in other creatures, such as in the dire men's resistance to other forms of magic, though this is a narrow scope. This kind of magic can be found permeating the very land itself, in the earth's wounds wrought by megaspells past, in rare metals and crystals, and it even shines faintly from the sun and stars. Natural magic is assumed to be related to the ascendancy of Patriarchs and the tales of fae creatures, though there is some debate as to whether the latter are simply myth muddled with sightings of entities from beyond the tattered veil.

Individuals can rarely be born with a connection to this type of magic, though it usually manifests in profoundly limited ways, frequently of little practical purpose. Those fortunate enough to be given a potent gift with real application are rarer than fallen stars, and none are known to exist at the time of writing. There is little to learn in this field of magic, as by its very nature it opposes being harnessed and used for others' purposes.

Arcane magic is magic learned, and by far the most difficult - but the most diverse and flexible - form of magic. Requiring a mortal mind capable of concentrating on the complex abstract structure of spells, arcane magic is the only kind of magic that can be learned with nothing but focus and dedication. However, these costs are high - it takes decades of training before a prospective mage can cast more than a handful of spells, such is the complexity of learning their patterns. Rare individuals with commitment in this field and the chance to dedicate themselves to training and spellcraft could one day become great archmagi, capable of improbable feats of magic.

This is because the focus and concentration required to cast these spells draws on a supernatural reservoir of arcane energy that can be accumulated by an arcane mage through magical training. This energy can take hours or even days to recover after using powerful magic, and draining it completely can profoundly tax a mage to the point of exhaustion, even inflicting physical or mental damage if they overestimate their capabilities. Furthermore, arcane magic is physically dangerous to the caster. If concentration on a spell is interrupted, it may simply collapse or else backfire spectacularly. Casting complex spells requires maintaining the structure of the spell mentally, which can take some time to properly visualize and play through to conclusion, and so disruption is a real threat, especially if magic is being used in a dangerous environment.

To this end, those who intend to use magic in combat or to aid them in times of urgent need use arcane foci. These can take the form of gems or jewellery, staves, wands or even weapons. Any metallic or crystalline object can be made a focus. Skilled arcane magi can cast spells into suitably prepared foci, expending some of their reservoir to fully prepare the spell ahead of time. This allows them to cast it faster in tight situations without worrying as much about it being disrupted, though they could equally just dissolve it in their focus and use the reclaimed energy to cast something else entirely, taking the regular amount of time.

Pact magic is the magic most directly connected to the worlds beyond the tattered veil. It is provided by outsiders, and represents both the magical abilities granted by them and the energy they give away to power them. This can come in the form of boons, such as a blessing of might, or it could come as spellcasting powers to be called on. Such spells are relatively quick and easy to cast and may not even risk backfiring, depending on what power was gained from what patron. Furthermore, they are limited only by how much power the patron outsider is willing or able to provide, and usually bear no risk of exhausting or damaging the caster from overtaxing themselves. The fact that such powers are relatively safe to use and do not take years of study no doubt make them attractive, but there are other risks involved in dealings beyond the veil.

Obviously, such powers draw from a source, and are limited by how much power the patron outsider is able to transfer to another creature. Many outsiders, particularly those of a fundamentally magical nature (such as the group informally known as elementals), can transfer their entire power to other creatures, while mighty Thaldrimm can cast off meaningless scraps of their power that are more than most mortals could ask for. However, actually gaining this power is potentially dangerous and normally requires either bargaining or coercion. Some magic, such as so-called symbiotic magic, focuses on entrapping lesser outsiders to force them to serve mortal masters, while on the other hand demonic cults have been known to have received dark blessings from their powerful otherworldly masters, only to have been easily destroyed by said masters using that very same connection once they had served their purpose.

Of course, this kind of magic cannot be easily practiced in isolation. Unless one were to happen across an patron this side of the veil looking to make a deal, or one were to enter into a society where group pact magic relationships had already been established with one or more outsiders, one would need to travel out of the physical world to make a deal. Furthermore, if one wanted to forcibly bind an outsider, they would most likely need some magic to achieve that end. As such, though pact magic does not directly cross over with arcane, natural or conduit magic, some mastery in one of those is usually necessary to gain a foothold in pact magic.

Conduit magic is a somewhat stranger, rarer kind of magic, which frequently crosses over with the others. It is the magic of controlling magic, directing it through conduits and using it to create magical items to execute some task of their own. Normally, casting magic requires the expenditure of magical energy by the caster. It is the source and method of manipulation of magic that traditionally defines the type of magic it is. Conduit magic is about sidestepping this system entirely and drawing energy from alternative sources. The most obvious example would be tapping alternate sources of magic to power arcane spells instead of drawing on one's own arcane reservoir, but this is even less reliable than using one's own power.

Another clear example of conduit magic in action would be necromancy, which usually requires another kind of magic to create. Though the secrets of the arcane spells required to set up a necromantic creation are understandably taboo in civilized society, the end result is a corpse animated by the body's own soul, imprisoned in its form with conduit magic. Even mindless undead have their souls brought back and tied into their bodies, and their very soul energy is what drives their unlife. As such, undead inherently burn their own life essence to maintain their animation, and eventually consume their souls entirely and cease to 'live'. A few powerful undead can derive life essence from other sources (typically other people's life essence or souls). These undead, for example liches and vampires, become effectively immortal. The fact that every undead being involves the imprisonment of a soul, usually against that soul's own wishes and in doing so denying it rest, is the reason necromancy is so vehemently opposed by almost all major religions.

Strange as it seems, enchantment works on similar principles. Though enchantment cannot use the connection between souls and their own bodies to automatically animate the bodies in ways resembling the way they moved in life, it can allow the tapping of sources of natural magic such as magical metals and crystals to achieve powerful spell effects. The fabrication of such enchantments is potentially costly and time consuming, though some methods exist which utilize arcane or pact magic to speed up the process and allow the creation of complex items. It is assumed that the lost techniques of golemcrafting used in the Golden Age were an even more advanced version of this method. Even without other magic, master craftsmen can sometimes find a deep emphatic connection with their craft, allowing them to use conduit magic to create masterwork items that are perhaps a keener or more durable than they should be, and if those people realize the truth of their skills, they could work with magical materials to make wondrous items indeed."
Reply
03-24-2016, 04:01 AM
Post: #78
RE: Spheres of Influence
NPC Nation: Underzweig

The Underzweig is a small and industrious nation of Kethul. It is a producer of finely crafted goods and extracted ores, and trades freely with many people. It is most notable for its strict societal segregation between Dregs and Clogs - the two sub-races live in separate parts of their cities, work in separate buildings, and even have food sent from different suppliers! This is most clear in their capital city, Khadun, a walled city of many thousands of dwarves. Khadun is split perfectly in two, forming two crescents of a full moon. Half of the city belongs to the Dregs, and the other half to the Clogs. A great wall lies in-between the two, pierced in the center by a small circle. Within that circle meet the highest echelons of Underzweig's leadership, and all the coordination of the country comes from within. No-one knows who rules in the depths of the Underzweig, save the rulers themselves.


The City of Izantin:
Izantin is a city-state known for being a nexus of trade. Many people of many races mingle within its walls, and commerce flows freely in its streets. It is loosely governed by a city council, who mainly keep the peace and make sure the city maintains its spotless reputation. Izantin is strictly neutral in all foreign affairs, though local empires have always had ambitions on its splendor. Perhaps someday this jewel, this city of cities, shall fall to an invader. But for now, it stands tall and proud.

Miscellany:

The Singing Woods: A collection of trees which have grown at the site of some powerful magic. Travelers feel a sense of calm under their boughs, and many report hearing beautiful voices from deep within the woods.

Shidatta, or Travels in Search of Truth: A famous and well-read novel by philosopher and author Nimue. It describes its main character's journey throughout the lands, examining the different peoples and their ideas on truth, love, and morality. The novel is known for its shifting style, beautiful depictions of scenery, and ill-defined main character, allowing the reader to project onto the unnamed protagonist's journey. Nimue has been criticized for adding fanciful imaginations to very real places, leading some to believe that the author has never in fact visited them. However, it is still a beloved book, especially among academics, philosophers, and artists.

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
03-24-2016, 06:29 AM
Post: #79
RE: Spheres of Influence
Among the coral reefs of the Tara lagoon is found a large underwater sinkhole, vanishing deep into the depths of the earth. Unbeknownst to most, this is the entrance to a massive underground cave-system spanning throughout the region, hiding pockets of air and dry land within - apparently, cracks in the ground keep some of these caverns supplied with air, while others are only resupplied with fresh air come the low tide.

It is within these caves that the storied Tinél el Varach is found, a resplendent city carved from the stone walls and lit by carefully cultivated bioluminescent corals. Standing sometimes above the water levels, and sometimes times beneath, Tinél el Varach is said to be populated by an aquatic subspecies of valtir, possessing fins and a long tail in place of legs. Though encounters with these strange folk have been few and far between, they have proven reasonable and even friendly, if rather difficult to approach, as they are rarely found outside their caves, and access to the lower caves, where Tinél el Varach is to be found, is nigh-impossible without gills, or help from the locals. Even so, the few who can claim to have traded with the denizens of that place return with impossible tales of the strange caves, bearing lustruous gems and metals noone has so much as heard of before. Even so, attempts to set up formal trade agreements have failed, for while these surprisingly sophisticated cave-dwellers are curious of the outside world, they have also proven cautious.
Reply
03-24-2016, 06:43 AM
Post: #80
RE: Spheres of Influence
Excerpt out of 'Forbidden Schools of the Arcane Chapter 4: Sect's of the East'

[...] A recurring phenomenon in these magic applications described in this book is that the spells were supposed to be benign in its conception yet the twisting of their uses made it into the forbidden spells they are today, This is especially apparent in magic having it roots beyond the expanse of the great sands for the people there seemingly were highly adept at its use. However at the time of this writing few practitioners of these sects remain and are generally undetectable within the populace.

The Art of Binding

"Your currency is spent, your memories tattered and torn, formed into mere cards for us to play with.."

The Art of Binding is one of the schools we know the most about, It apparently started as way of archiving the stories and relics of heroes and the great threats they faced in immaculate detail. If a adventurer or hero would reach the end of their life, Be it either natural or inflicted they would visit a member* of the sect. They would use a ritual that would used arcane magic to 'bind' their very memories into a magical conduit In this case small little tablets, 'cards' if you will that circulated the magic that was infused prior to it. if containment spell was broken or interrupted it would send the one breaking it in into a replica of the event until it was played out.

This process effectively copied the memories of the one that it was cast on into the self contained 'card', This was usually done at the end of a important person's life.. however since one 'card' could only contain one memory they had to make a lot of them.. so they eventually linked cards to each other using tokens, which contained the follow up to the memory that was in the card holding the token.. if one could go trough the memory in the manner it was supposed to go.

Now as all forms of magic this was improved upon and experimented with, What about a heroic adventurer's fabled worldly possessions? what about their foes? what about various magical boons and hindrances, all must have been recorded right? With such bounty piling up within their cards more enterprising members of the sect even started trying to bind living creatures into servitude.

Corrupted from within it became kind of a 'game' to them. Luring in people with promises of 'immortality' and leading them to a maze of their own memories and mystical gear having the adventurer fighting their bound minions... and if he loses they would leaving with nothing, even their memories would be gone if you didn't end up within their...collection

Now i'd warn you to keep an eye out, for there are still some rumors these people walk among us.. Be wary of traveling merrymakers or troupes, fortune tellers and soothsayers or mystical sages living in recluse or perhaps you'll end up playing the game yourself.

*an artist's rendition of such a member
[Image: Mage%20Artists%20rendition_zpshmummuvc.png]
Reply
03-24-2016, 08:42 AM (This post was last modified: 03-24-2016 10:11 AM by Acolyte Doctor.)
Post: #81
RE: Spheres of Influence
Grievances of the Magical World: An Extensive Codex To Visceral Woes For The Common Healer

Fierceblood Syndrome (Diretosis) – some Dire Men are born or inflicted with a grievous disorder where when exposed to an immense amount of magic, they temporarily transform into a larger, strong, and hairier form, complete with full magical immunity. While they are in this state, they lose themselves into a frenzy, and indiscriminately wreak havoc among friend and foe until they become exhausted, then they turn back into their original forms. Anyone unfortunate enough to be bitten by Dire Men in that state run a risk of succumbing to the Fierceblood Syndrome themselves.

It is known in the Golden Age, alchemists had taken note of the more superhuman aspects of Fierceblood altered state – and attempted to adapt it to military applications. However, deliberately infecting yourself with Fierceblood is not considered socially welcome, even among Dire Men.

Fierceblood Syndrome is fairly common but restricted to woodland areas, particularly with a high magically count. It is known to be transmitted to Dire Men, Elvár, Mún, Kethúl, Windfolk, Nurkum, and in one terrifying case, a Patriarch.

---

Beauty Sleep (Thaumatosomnia) – The practice of magic is carefully monitored in Elvár or Elvár-dominated countries due to this infamous infliction. Beauty Sleep is spectacular disorder that occurs when Elvár blood and magic intersect each other in a way that is terrible for the magician. The initial symptoms are lethargy, a tendency to fall asleep at inappropriate times, and ultimately accumulates in the Elvár falling to a deep, deep sleep where they could not be awakened from. Immediately after, the Elvár are cocooned in crystals, which then rapidly spread into any reasonable source of magic. In magical academies or high-magic areas like an aftermath of a magical backfire, this could be particularly disastrous as the threat of suffocation is real even when you are not a magician.

The Beauty Sleep crystals do not infect other Elvár with Beauty Sleep, and in fact, make excellent arcane foci. However, its potential widespread use is severely limited since it ultimately came from a pseudo-dead person, which is honestly kind of reasonable. There are rumors that there are established Crystal Farms that churn out these particular foci, but those are just lies and slander. Probably.

Beauty Sleep is rare and seem to be endemically limited to elves who are in their late-adulthood and have heavily interacted with magic, although spontaneous cases beyond these limits had been documented before.

---

Undead’s Lament (PRD, Primordial Resurrection Disease) – When an undead has been killed-and-raised too many times, they suffer this. Due to some undead sort of magical control system being broken off due to the quick cycling of unlife-and-lack-of-life, the undead begins to rapidly revive and die without any external limit, magic or otherwise.

During the process, the undead’s body begins to rapidly mutate, growing extra anatomical parts – arms, eyes, livers, so on – quickly burning through the soul. The process speeds up until the undead’s body cannot keep up with the visceral and soul-cost, rapidly turning into bloody soul-less mush. Considering the entire process is extremely painful for the victim, Undead’s Lament is considered abominable even to the undead themselves.

Undead’s Lament seems to be limited to how potent the undead is and how many times they resurrected. The stronger the undead’s soul is, the fewer times they resurrected, the less likely they would suffer this insidious disease. It is fortunately not transmissible, but it does happen more than it should be.
Reply
03-24-2016, 09:03 AM
Post: #82
RE: Spheres of Influence
The Gardeners

The Gardeners are a secretive cult dawning back to the Age of Formless Torment. A group of ancient druidic figures who foretold that the folly of mortals had nearly brought the planet itself to destruction, and that one day, they could again. Nowadays the cult of the Gardeners mostly seeks to prevent what they see as irreparable damage to the natural world, such as the destruction of forests, the pollution of lakes and seas, the extinction of ancient races, but the leaders of the cult remember that ultimately their true purpose is greater still than the protection of nature, but of the world itself. To this end, whilst most of their common forces are essentially a militant guerilla greenpeace, made of skilled rangers and elemental mages, more specialized and skilled branches exist whom attempt to dispose rising political and militant forces, be it by insinuating themselves into local politics through more legal means, or through assassination of potentially dangerous figures. The existence of superweapons in particular is a great worry to them, as are beings that through political or military might seek to conquer the world. They see it as their duty to prune out the weeds and sickness of the world to keep it safe and do so with a zealousness and stoic dedication that lets them act without remorse or doubt..

“One day you wake up and realize the world can be conquered.” - Doctor Impossible
Reply
03-24-2016, 10:00 AM (This post was last modified: 03-31-2016 11:33 AM by Palamedes.)
Post: #83
RE: Spheres of Influence
Nations:

Great Alliance of Kind: Made up of dozens of states of various sizes and power, the GAK was formed when the various threats of superpower-armed neighbours necessitated those without to have some means of fighting back. While generally disorganized day to day, the GAK can be an exceptionally formidable threat known should one attempt to attack a member state (especially unprovoked) as the whole idea is that they need to work together to beat any of the greater powers. Rumour has it that the mightiest states within the alliance are working on developing a superweapon of their own. The GAK is, as one might assume, made up of nations ruled and populated by Humans, Elves, and Dwarves and the majority of said states are highly xenophobic towards other races.

The City-State of Fault: Faultis is one of the most well known and prolific Patriarchs still active in the developed world. He is also the only one to actively own land, being the lord and master of an entire country. Of course, in typical outsider fashion his country is in fact just a single humble keep and a couple of small, distant villages and has no military force to speak of. Nonetheless, Fault is mysteriously left well enough alone by its neighbours, no matter how aggressive they might be and despite how frustrating its leader's adamant refusal to give advice to other rulers or travelers is. Those who have been, at times in the past, adamant about even the smallest attack have either changed their mind overnight, never speaking of why, or vanished without a trace or any sign of foul play.

"Duchy" of Under: A small but strong Nurkum tribe, they are infamous (and given a mocking land title) for remaining in the same general, highly populated location. Despite generally being known to stick around, the dwarves and other races nearby have always had a difficult time dealing with them. Capturing the tribe as a whole has never been difficult, but their nameless leader always manages to escape, overpower his captors, and lead his tribe to safety. They seem to have a tendency to always cause the biggest problem they possibly can as well, targeting valuable operations or individuals and taking everything that isn't nailed down.

Individuals of Note:

Arco Zem: An ancient windfolk, Zem is the mightiest arcane caster alive today. Wowed by her charisma and talent, she picks up dozens of apprentices wherever she travels, including those that are supposed to be serving rulers. Unfortunately, Zem is also something of an oddity, an exceptional master of the arcane arts that has never had issues with the magic's incredible danger - even when using it in a fight - and thus teaches an unconventional style of arcana that focuses on power and flexibility over safety and mastery. This has had the unfortunate side effect that very few of her pupils survive for longer than a couple of years after becoming part of her "Suicide School", and even worse many move on to teach every magic user they know of her unconventional methods. Despite the danger, everyone hopes to become the next Zem.

Dragon: Only two dragons are known to exist in the world that can truly be called ancient wyrms, comparable to the fiercest legends from before the Fall. One, of course, is Zo, the immense and totally real ruler of Arcavat who always has the power of 30-50 powerful mages at any given time and seems to ignore even the most deadly of blows as if they passed right through him and is also definitely real and not fake. The other is even older, a monster so ancient that it never had a need for a name and capable of destroying entire countries singlehandedly. All, even others of its kind, simply call it Dragon as if it was in fact the progenitor of the entire race. Dragon, despite being the most powerful mortal to possibly ever exist (some suspect it knows life-prolonging magic) has no designs on interacting with the world at large. Instead it maintains a roost at the top of an impassable mountain in some desolate land, hoping to live out its remaining however long it has without any interruption. Those that do pass by run the risk that typically comes with entering dragon land and being found - pay or die - however Dragon requires curious tribute. Having been alive long enough to know the Myoxians, Dragon has moved past the need for simple treasures, desiring the only thing he believes he can no longer find - knowledge he has yet been unable to gain. Those who can teach or reveal some new fact or secret to Dragon pass unharmed, and if their knowledge is found to be particularly important or interesting they might even be offered treasure in return - either in gold or information.

Naroger: The Sarin are renowned for being bigger, tougher, and better than most races, but even that is underselling Naroger. Part folk legend, part reality, the famous adventurer has been to almost every corner of the world and done every deed you've likely ever heard of. He has a tendency to get involved in things far beyond his power and control with only a desire to face them head on and a magic warhammer to do so with, and his penchant for getting into trouble is matched only by his almost supernatural ability to get out of it. He is loved by the masses, and generally hated by rulers who have to pick up after his messes.

Legends and Conspiracy Theories:

The Secret Court: A dangerous society who believe in honour, rules, and order and have a hand in much of the developed world - though they're mostly just self-righteous assassins of primarily Lushedi descent. While most believe them a myth, too many have reached too far and too despicably in selfish quests that they were judged, found guilty, and made to vanish by the secret society. Given the fact that they have far more enemies than friends, it is believed by those who do think they are real that they are constantly relocating their base of operations whenever the need arises.

The Menagerie: Founded and run by what used to be an old circus family, the Menagerie is a secret black market for only the most exotic and dangerous goods. While of course one could find drugs and weapons just like in any underground market, the Menagerie stands out for its selection of natural products and how far they will go to acquire them. Need the lethal poison of the rare Mummified Beetle? You can bet the Menagerie hunted it down and tested its effectiveness on at least three members of different races. That Trinoceron you wanted to mount that siege weapon to for your upcoming campaign can be ready in weeks as well, with only the smallest fee for every slain hunter and trainer. They'll even throw in a pack of hunting scarabs for free. Given how much time and effort is given towards capturing and taming horrible monsters, one might suspect they like to primarily employ Valtir. One would be right.

The Last City: Somewhere in the deepest ocean lies one of the cities of the Aun and their great masters, the Marid. The city, grander than even the mightiest land capital, lies untouched by whatever it was that destroyed the Marid in the first place, still showing the incredible glory and might of their advanced civilization. The city itself, however, appears completely empty. Nothing around it, and even the mindless fish of the sea know better than to come within miles of it. Something does live there, however, something unseen and terrible. Or so one must assume, if they are to believe the stories of mad sailors and ruins divers who claim to have found the city and been the only survivor of some unspeakable terror.

The Bleak Crusades: At the edge of developed civilization lies a narrow sea, and past that is a vast and inhospitable desert. The pros: it is filled with valuable mineral deposits, important ruins, and treasures left behind by those unfortunate fools who are always trying to take it. The wasteland stretches on for longer than any could possibly survive travelling through, and that is completely ignoring the danger if its inhabitants. Dire men and angry, jilted Vox live in the nooks and crannies of the wasteland, rare enough at first but becoming more and more inhabited as one goes on that eventually you wouldn't be able to swing a stick without hitting one of the savages. Even more worrying, however, is the long and storied history of what has come out of the deserts. Twelve times in known history have the denizens of the desert gathered, en masse, and invaded the more developed world via stolen and poorly constructed ships (usually from those who came for all the treasure, as noted above), with early ones credited for being a large part of why the Myoxian Empire collapsed and later ones supposedly almost wiping out civilization itself. While, of course, large incursions (particularly dire ones), even from the desert itself, are common enough that this wouldn't stand out normally, what sets the twelve attacks apart are the savagery and organization of them. While such attacks usually result in either pillaging and retreating or occupying until they are driven out, what have become known as the desert's Bleak Crusades always pushed as far as they could instead of just scavenging and looting like they normally do, only ever driven out by use of superweapons or massive organized force. Even more noticeable is the reverence that the attacks are always attributed to a single individual, their great leader Addoban, who, as legends say, wields a weapon of magical destruction so awful it can force the conversion of any mortal race, even dragons, into dire abominations. Addoban's longevity is attributed to many things, with common suggestions being a dragon, a lich relying on an army of Dire Men and Vox, some strange subspecies of dire men that pass leadership on, and most ridiculously a mighty Thaldrimm overcome a millennium ago through sheer force of numbers. Either way, Addoban and its weapon are believed to just be common legend anyways, and it has been so long since a Bleak Crusade that most scholars even question whether they were anything other than fearful myths passed on by peasants to begin with.

Greed: A Blight of poor strength, great potential, and believed by scholars to not really be a threat due to it being almost completely destroyed during the Fall. It is only believed to have survived this long due to having invisibility abilities far beyond the rest of its kind. Can also focus on large areas at once, such as multiple countries, but can only ever absorb the greed of the few most powerful individuals. You know, like rulers. It also feeds off of its namesake. I'm sure it won't become a problem.
Reply
03-24-2016, 10:10 AM
Post: #84
RE: Spheres of Influence
The Deepwater Cult:

While the Aun are a peaceful and gentle species, there are some among them who fall into more deviant behavior. From the little contact we land-based researchers have with this aquatic folk, we have determined that they are a sort of apocalyptic cult, believing they had discovered the cause of the downfall of Marid civilization. They worship some great and monstrous deity who sleeps deep beneath the waves, deeper than any diver can swim, and say that one day he shall re-awaken and drown the land with his power. The Deepwater cult are to be considered dangerous, as they have been known to drag swimmers beneath the waves, especially small children. It is suspected that they have access to some powerful necromantic magics, as drowned people are sometimes seen walking the shores, attacking those who draw near. Whatever the case may be, they are more of a nuisance than a threat to the land-based civilizations of the world, as the rest of the Aun seem determined to keep the Deepwater suppressed.

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
03-24-2016, 10:28 AM (This post was last modified: 03-24-2016 10:54 AM by Protoman.)
Post: #85
RE: Spheres of Influence
Les Enragés:

In certain feudal societies in which the gap between peasantry and aristocracy has grown too wide, a new ideology has taken hold. Known as The Angry Ones, these peasants question the legitimacy of a government founded on royal blood, and seek a society in which all men are equal, where no man is master of any other, and where no child shall go hungry.

The first major uprising occurred in a small barony held by a particularly callous nobleman. After a long famine, the mothers among the peasantry begged him for food for their starving young. He tried to send them off. They refused to go. When it became clear they would not move, he instructed his men to open fire.

When the remnants of the crowd returned to the village, they showed their wounds to their fellows and spoke of the baron's atrocities. The men of the village joined with their women and returned to the castle.

When the baron refused their demands once more, the folk of the village decided to see whether royal blood flowed the same as anyone else's.

Many expected the uprising to be put down by the baron's overlord. It was not. The peasantry seized a nearby armory and armed themselves with muskets, pikes, and cannons. When the count sent an army led by his son to put down the uprising, they were surprised by just how numerous and well-armed the peasants were, and entered a standoff. After a day of tension, the peasant leader - a charismatic peasant called Jean Heureux - rode out in front of his army and spoke. He talked to the men of the army - mostly peasants themselves - of the injustice of feudal hierarchy. He spoke of the evils of the nobility and the royalty, and of the hope for a bright tomorrow in which all men would be equal. His words were well-received, and within a matter of hours, the army had turned on itself and beheaded their aristocratic leader (as well as the loyalists who stood by his side.)

The peasant army grew and grew, slaughtering nobles and recruiting peasants in every town they passed through. Upon reaching the capital, they executed the king - a weak, benign figurehead - and proclaimed the end of the aristocracy. Within a matter of months, they had seized the nation and proclaimed Jean Heureux Director of the Revolution.

As his first act, Jean established an international propaganda wing. He'd send men trained in diplomacy out to far-off lands to pose as merchants, actors, and musicians, to spread the word of Les Enragés, to proclaim the beginning of an era of equality, and to demand an end to nobility.

Now the nobility and the royalty have something to fear, for Les Enragés do not fear death, they do not grant mercy, and they lie in wait anywhere that the poor are mistreated.
Reply
03-24-2016, 10:39 AM
Post: #86
RE: Spheres of Influence
Empire of the Zun: Stretching among the border of the great desert wastes and the civilized world is the Empire of the Zun. A walled off and xenophobic theocracy of Mún that worships the sun itself, what is known of their laws is that they are brutal and ruthless. They rarely interact with other nations except for when a small company of renegades decides to seek their fortune as mercenaries, There is nothing as spectacular and terrifying as seeing fire-spewing golden-clad camel-riding cataphracts storming a hapless enemy force.

Their cities are a series of fortifications and bulwarks stretching across the desert watched over by their feared sun towers, giant mirror's that burn the ground with the power of the sun as dire-men raiding parties who came to close have experienced.

Their wealth supposedly comes from a giant pool of molten gold and it shows. their clothes, armor and goods all have been coated with a layer of gold. it is even said they have golden war golems. They are truly the golden gateway of the east.

It is also noted that the Empire of the Zun prohibits any form of magic on the penalty of judgement by Zun. which is wandering the desert with nothing for a set time. They only allow mún within their borders grudgingly and kill dire-men on sight.
Reply
03-29-2016, 08:15 AM (This post was last modified: 04-01-2016 06:02 AM by Vancho1.)
Post: #87
RE: Spheres of Influence
The Flag of the Eorelan Republic:

[Image: Flag-Eorela.png]

"The Flag of the Republic shall consist of the following elements:

1. A bright gold Star in the center representing the Holy Country and its successor the Republic.

2. Four gold rays representing the republican virtues: Liberty, Equality, Justice, and Brotherhood.

3. Four sections of color, the top a blue representing science and learning, the left a red representing industry and trade, the right fuchsia representing art and culture, and the bottom green representing nature and agriculture."

Flag with darker colors:

[Image: Flag-Eorela-dark.png]

Flag with Non-Pastel Colors:

[Image: Flag-Eorela-Primary.png]

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
03-29-2016, 10:12 PM (This post was last modified: 03-29-2016 10:15 PM by Protoman.)
Post: #88
RE: Spheres of Influence
The Flag of the Amaro Zor

[Image: QPt3swR.png]

Elements:

On the top and bottom, dark red fields to symbolize the blood shed by men and women long before us who faced persecution and slaughter with bravery, never conforming, even at the tip of a sword or the barrel of a gun.

In the center there are two separate fields, one green and one blue. The blue represents the great sky above our heads, the green represents the lush earth below our feet. Over the blue is the word Slobuzenja, meaning freedom. Over the green is the word Pralipe, meaning brotherhood.

The Religion of the Amaro Zor

The Amaro Zor believe there is one great, nameless, formless, and infinite god that exists in every living being and is the basis of the soul. This god expresses itself naturally through creativity and curiousity. It is the drive to move forward, even in a world that is harsh and unforgiving. The closest thing to a name the Amaro Zor ever try to apply to this great, unifying god is Jívaben - Life.


The Amaro Zor see all genuine religions (that is to say, ones that don't exist to benefit an individual or one group or to oppress another, ones that instead try to explain why we're here and what our purpose is) as imperfect attempts to grasp this utterly unfathomable god. Despite their imperfections - or perhaps because of them - they are all worth celebration, because they are all expressions of the creativity this divinity has granted us.

That being said, the Amaro Zor also understand that there is great evil in the soul, and place the blame for this evil on what they call the World Spirit. The World Spirit is very much what it sounds like - the essence of material goods, inanimate objects, and the world itself. This spirit is not evil itself - merely selfish. It existed long before life, and in its solitude, it found only loneliness. The World is terrified that one day Jívaben might grow bored and leave, so it seeks to shackle itself to the soul with desire. It taints the soul with the only emotion it has: greed. It makes the soul want, not just to create, but to attain wealth, power, pleasure, and recognition.

The Amaro Zor believe it is not wise to reject the World entirely. Rather, they feel it is best to embrace it without being consumed with desire and losing sight of the soul's true passions. Why deny things that are beautiful, or that make you happy? Indulge in them, the Amaro Zor say, but do not lose sight of yourself, or of your soul's true purpose. Creation is beautiful for creation's sake, and inquisitiveness for inquisitiveness' sake. Profit, power, pleasure, and recognition may come as a secondary benefit to those aims, but one must not lose sight of the beauty in the act itself. By staying on this righteous path, the World might one day realize that Jívaben is not looking to abandon it, and that it needs not shackle the soul in fear of being alone.

Because Jívaben exists in all beings, all living things are owed proper respect. You cannot slaughter livestock in a manner that causes it excessive pain, nor can you raise it in a way that degrades it. You cannot steal the life of an intelligent creature unless they have been taken action that threatens the life of another intelligent creature. You cannot restrict or infringe upon the freedoms of another intelligent creature unless it is in a manner that protects the freedoms of every other intelligent creature, and it is applied fairly and with justice. If the World blinds you to the common respect owed to all living creatures as a piece of the greater whole, your soul has been blinded by the World, and you are owed retribution for your misdeeds equal to your misconduct.

might be a little incoherent. I stayed up way too late writing this. I'll edit it when i'm not half-dead.
Reply
03-29-2016, 10:59 PM
Post: #89
RE: Spheres of Influence
Flag of the Witch-Realm

[Image: Witch-Realm%20Flag_zpslwqfxmew.png]

Elements:

The people of Andúr only banded together as a 'nation' on two separate occasions in history and thus never properly had a flag to themselves. Even at this moment Andúr is still a collection of separate communities.. Yet if a flag would have been conceptualized it would probably look something like this, representing the two historical emblems of when Andúr stood as one, The crow was a symbol of the unified mún clans that stood up against a empire long ago, Stained red by a desire for vengeance for their lost way of life. The Mountains of Andúr are proudly displayed in the background, a constant reminder of the harshness of the land, They are proudly colored in white, representing the rule of the current steward and wizard.

The flag represents crow rising from the mountains of Andúr, symbolizing the new realm of Andúr rising to take its place in the world once more..
Reply
03-31-2016, 07:25 AM
Post: #90
RE: Spheres of Influence
The librarians.

A group of mages/assassins that specialize in seeking out secrets and forgotten lore. They say they have a secret library hidden in the land where you could find books and knowledge thought long since lost, even records of the Formless Torment? They spend their efforts infiltrating cabals and cults, changing their identities in an instant and tearing the very memories if necessary from victims minds, and if necessary leaving a trail of death and fire behind them to cover their tracks as they take holy books, cursed tomes or stories spoken down mouth to mouth through time with them.

Wush-zian

Wandering figures, clad in simple cloths of two colours travel the lands, never in larger groups than three. Monasteries dot along the land, typically in lonesome areas isolated from the rest of society, be it a lone stone building in a snowy, barren land or atop a mountain or hidden away in a forest. Each monastery garbs it's members in a different primary colour, with the secondary trim of the clothing showing the role or skills each member is. Many different races make up their membership, but they all cover their lower faces and possess the same fashion style, so the only identification they care about are their colours, race doesn't matter once you join. Each member has strange skills in unarmed combat, able to overcome at the very least a typical warrior, and they have their own language and culture, so if a group meets up they'll tend to flock together for a while at least, laughing and going through their own little rituals as they talk to each-other and spread across information. They all act according to a certain discipline that they claim defines their morality and honour, they may disagree and argue over certain actions and issues, but as a rule, they're benevolent and simple beings, that act with rigid determination.

Those with red trim appear to be mercenary in nature, typically working as silent body-guards for caravans, loyal and deadly figures, rarely beaten even in three-on-one fights, wielding strange weapons as they fight. Those with green trim seem to be skilled in medicine and possess strange knowledge of the bodies working, sometimes being able to heal wounds and illnesses with just their hands. Blue trim are used typically as messengers, known for their reliability in delivering the message and assuring, at the very least, the secrecy or protection of the message or item. Purple trim dispense knowledge, like wandering teachers and tutors and bringers of news from foreign lands. It's not unheard of for nobility to try to hire one to teach their child for a term, imparting skills and knowledge useful for a future politician or leader of men, or sometimes they simply go through a village, imparting foreign farming techniques and simple applications of local plants or other common tricks of lore they've picked up on their travels. Black trimmed and white trimmed members are rarely seen at times, both tend to wield strange magic styles, and if attacked in melee, seamlessly use magic and physical combat to quickly dispatch a foe.

A lone member or duo can sometimes be found travelling with an Amaro caravan, assisting as they can with the caravan's needs in return for the travel company, showing off their own strange music, dance and other cultural arts. As it is, the ultimate goal of the Wush-zian is unknown, as they do tend to ignore direct questions about their ways.

“One day you wake up and realize the world can be conquered.” - Doctor Impossible
Reply
03-31-2016, 11:45 AM
Post: #91
RE: Spheres of Influence
Nations That Shouldn't Be:

Krujat: The only major Sarin nation of note, was once a reasonably sized city-state near the edges of civilized lands. Things changed when its ambitious ruler tried to gather a large number of Sarin under their control and use their drive to travel as an incentive to plunder and conquer. Of course, it backfired in a most spectacular fashion. The Sarin, once gathered and directed in a more focused nomadic way, realized that they could use this new strategy for their own kind instead of in the name of some other. They took the city, then traveled to the ruler's vassals and conquered them as well. There are now almost no regular inhabitants of Krujat - it is an unspoken law that one should always be traveling, returning only to the country should you have found something in your journeys that benefits the nation... or, more distressingly, to answer the call for a crusade of conquest.

Guercebon: A large island nation inhabited primarily by windfolk and lushedi. Used to be two countries where one was ruled and populated by each race. Depending on who you ask, it never stopped being that. A political marriage between the rulers saved it from war over a century ago, but when they died they left twins as their heirs, each claiming to be ruler of the whole island and passing that claim onto their kin. It is a civil war, and also a civil war. Neither refuses to accept only half the title or to live outside of the imperial palace, and so both rulers occupy the castle in the centre of the island while still fighting battles everywhere else over who deserves it. The only reason the country hasn't fallen is because someone already tried to conquer them once and wasn't quite prepared. It lead both heads of the country to realize that even though they hated the idea of the other ruling them, and outsider as their leader was definitely worse and so they never let their war get that out of hand.

Which is probably why it still rages on to this day.

The Traveling Kingdom of Sphoṭa Vyak: Sphota Vyak, is, as of this writing, the closest thing to a vox leader. It grew up fighting against mankind's oppression and discrimination, learned it was pointless, and spent some time traveling with caravans as a guard - which it did very well given how Vox generally take very little damage from ranged blows and few want to tangle with something that will blow up in their face in the best case scenario. Traveling allowed Sphota Vyak to meet and interact with other vox in an almost charismatic way, and attracted a following pretty quickly. This was, of course, frowned upon by just about anyone who didn't want to risk dozens of vox blowing up the countryside if something went wrong, but attempts to break up the group only angered Sphota Vyak and its followers and attracted further vox to the cause.

This growth cumulated in Sphota Vyak invading the town they grew up near. Obviously after the first few dead vox obliterated whatever defences there were few had the will or means to fight, and even more obviously the vox army was defeated not even a week later by the town's overlord - though that hadn't stopped Sphota Vyak from being crowned as king (queen?) of the vox and escaping with the title.

Now Sphota Vyak and its army travel the lands as mercenaries and occasional looters, looking to get enough funds, weapons, and support to press its claims once again. A lot of people don't like it, but hey - the vox are cheap, the platonic ideal of disposable, and some combination of their horrible, horrible war screams and their combat explosions just makes enemies want to give up.

There is also a rare book written by a mage who no longer exists, and justly remembered by none.

Wonders of Arcavat:

The Allroads: Throughout Arcavat and within the borders of nearby friendly kingdoms are enchanted signs, appearing as signs normally would but with one small detail - an golden, illusory arrow atop each one points down the road that leads to Arcavat's capital - a city of opulent wealth, wonders and conveniences of magic and metal, and home to a dragon that rules the country and is said to grant wishes to those who prove their worth. The magic effects the path slightly as well, giving them a slightly yellow tinge over the years. Only a small amount of magic is needed monthly to renew the enchantment on any individual sign, and for a slightly greater amount of power the enchantment can be pushed to the next sign in the link. Of course, that stacks, and a mage acting on a sign at the end of the chain can use up their magic for the day, while two dozen might act at once if powering signs through the capital's main gate and could still be drained for a week.

The Gemstone Throne: Home to Zo and his most trusted mages, the palace is the glittering jewel of Arcavat. Built upon and leading into the ancient library fortress that founded the country, the throne is actually an elaborate palace built from enchanted stone and brick to appear as if it was made of opaque emerald. It is a beautiful sight to behold, even more so when Zo hosts a rare audience and light is allowed in at the right places, allowing it to shine both inside and out without any indoor lighting.

The Keinwahk: About a decade after the rise of Zo, the a large tribe of dire men, led by the legendary warrior 'king' Toerdrak, sieged the dragon's glittering capital. Toerdrak offered a challenge to the city, offering to spare all the inhabitants if and only if what he had heard was the strongest thing alive would best him in single combat. It was a fearsome battle between the false king and the dragon, due primarily to Toerdrak's magic resistance and the dire man's inability to discover the illusion, much less shatter it. However, dire men are only resistant to magic, not necessarily the after effects, and one of many 'thrown' boulders left the warrior crippled and defeated.

This show of Zo's might struck Toerdrak and his tribe, and while most scattered a fair number offered their service to the dragon against any mages who would threaten the dragon that bested their greatest champion. They became Zo's elite guard, the Keinwahk, their frightening and dangerous nature made greater with the finest arms and armour available for as long as Zo lives and they remember his deeds. And, as is known, Zo is nigh eternal, and dire memories can last just as long.

The Monkara Guard: Early in Zo's rule he was paid tribute by a famous windfolk inventor. It was there that the first deal was made and the tales of Zo's powers as a wish-granter began. The windfolk provided Zo with the Gemstone throne, and in return Zo provided them with... something. It was never made clear what, and anyone you ask will give you a different answer - power, salvation, life, love, etc. The descendants of that windfolk and her people are still indebted to Zo, whatever wish was granted, and many serve him at his palace. While more or less glorified housekeepers and messengers, they are all trained and armed to defend their master's interests should the need arise.

The final page is blank, the entry no longer exists.

The Bir Kavir: A powerful artifact created at great cost by the wizards of Arcavat, members of Zo's Soul and Wisdom use it to store details of Zo throughout the history of their meetings and deliberations so that they may be called upon in a moment's time.
Reply
04-01-2016, 04:06 AM
Post: #92
RE: Spheres of Influence
The Traveler's Compendium of Rare Beasts and other Creatures, by Hurun, a sarin scribe

Torrus: This majestic predator bird is easily as large as a horse - that is, without accounting for its wingspan. Found most commonly in arid or tropical climates, they are highly territorial and aggressive, and have been known to go to great lengths to chase down and even kill anyone it views as an intruder. It seems to fear anything that rivals it in size, however, which, combined with their few numbers, has made my task of studying the creature rather difficult.

Seemingly dependant on the climate in which they live, their feathers range in color from sandybrown to black, though the males of the species always bear a distinctive bright red plumage.

The torrus is often praised within certain windfolk cultures as a sacred creature, though other windfolk simply fear them, as it is considered a death sentence to be caught in the air within a torrus' territory. In either case, the windfolk are perfectly happy to leave the torrus alone in most circumstances.

On the other hand, the torrus are highly respected by the valtir for entirely different reasons. I had the luck of encountering a group of traveling valtir windriders recently, who told me of some of the challenges they faced when taming wild torrus. Apparently, the creatures are extremely stubborn and prideful which, paired with their aggression, makes them both dangerous and difficult to attempt to tame, requiring great patience and discipline to properly subdue - poorly-tamed torrus have been known to fling their riders to their deaths before escaping, never to be seen again. Even so, taming a torrus brings great honor to the valtiri who can manage the feat, and almost certainly secures them a place within the torrus breeding community, as the great birds breed slowly, and torrus eggs are in very high demand among those with the money to pay for them.

Chasmwyrm: I have been chasing legends of these creatures for years now. At last, I can confirm their existence.

As we were heading to the homeland between expeditions, my troupe and I came across a large, inexplicable hole in the ground. We might have mistaken it for some cave system or the like if we had not camped on this very spot only a few months back, where there before had certainly not been any such hole.

So we explored. At first, it seemed merely a long, uniform tunnel, more than twice as long in diameter as the tallest among us, but soon enough we found other tunnels leading off in other directions. I've seen tunnels dugout by animals before, but something about these tunnels seemed more stable and permanent than a mere hole in the ground, though I cannot say what exactly.

Sometimes, the tunnel passed through other underground caves, some filled with wondrous crystals, others with dripping stalactites, and others again were nothing but great pools of water. As we never explored the entirety of the place, even now I can only wonder at the enormity of these tunnel systems. Perhaps I shall return some day.

Regardless, we eventually reached a great chamber, and in it we found the chasmwyrm. Like a great eyeless snake, it lay curled about itself within a depression in the center of the chamber, watching us without eyes. Unlike a snake, it bore chitinous protrusions upon its head, clearly well-suited for digging, aswell as in ridges down the back of its spine. I cannot say for certain, but I suspect something about these was what gave the creature's tunnels their remarkable stability. A hardening fluid stored in hollows within the carapace, perhaps?

We stayed there for days as, to my surprise, the chasmwyrm did not seem to care about us at all, as long as we kept our distance. I do not know what it eats, but I do not think it is carnivorous, or even the slightest bit aggressive. If you find tunnels like those I have described, do not fear the wyrm that built them- rather, fear its passing. While we were fortunate enough to avoid such a fate, i do not doubt that it would crush any against the walls of its tunnels should it happen to pass through the same tunnel as yourself.

Alsin: Best described as large, feathered lions for lack of a better analogy. Bearing great talon-like claws and a voracious appetite, alsin are the apex predators of any large forest. Their feathers are most commonly the greens and browns of forest colors, but blacks and reds have also been seen on occasion. Vicious enough to give even a bear or one of my own people pause, there are few things that are brave or foolish enough to stand their ground before a hungry alsin. Fortunately, they are solitary creatures, and while they can sometimes be found in pairs, you are unlikely to ever meet more than two at once.

At best, alsin are viewed as dangerous pests by the locals. At worst, as hated monsters preying on farmer's livestock or on unfortunate travelers. The exception, ofcourse, are the valtir, who view them as loyal mounts suited both for travel, war, and, of all things, as pets. Apparently, they are quite loyal when tame, and are well known for being more intelligent than even a dog, though somewhat less sociable. It seems that simply keeping an alsin well-fed is enough to win you its loyalty, and though the practice is only popular among the valtir, it is not unheard of for rich nobles of other races to own an alsin.

As a side note, alsin feathers are highly prized as quills, both for their beauty and durability. I am not certain why the creatures have feathers at all, but there is no denying that an alsin quill simply lasts longer than the quills of any bird.

Malfish: Also known as eelfish, malfish are a species of large eel known for their poisonous barbs and succulent flesh. Always fetching a high price at market, malfish are both hated and loved by fishermen as, in addition to the risk of being stung with extremely painful poison known to deaden fingers or entire limbs, the malfish are also likely to bite through the fisher's nets, ruining an entire catch. For this reason, experienced fishermen keep careful watch after the malfish's silvery form snaking through the water, keeping spears at the ready to stab them to death and pull them aboard before they can work their mischief.
Reply
04-01-2016, 09:01 AM (This post was last modified: 04-01-2016 08:23 PM by Anomaly.)
Post: #93
RE: Spheres of Influence
Excerpt from A Definitive Guide to the Dead, by the Great Dracolich MORTEMIA:

[...]

IV. VAMPIRES

Perhaps one of the best-known varieties of the undead, Vampires are an unfortunately self-sustaining phenomenon - and depending on the preferences of the vampires in question, an outright plague on the living and the dead alike. Unlike most undead, vampires look remarkably like the living, except paler, gaunter, and all-around even less appealing. Vampires may very well be the creation of some crazed necromancer in a long-forgotten age - with such a bizarre array of abilities and altogether pathetic weaknesses, it's a wonder they've even lasted into modern times.

Popular wisdom is that vampires drink blood. This is actually a complete lie, made up by frightened peasants. No, the truth is much more interesting, and probably even less desirable. Vampires, when claiming a victim, suck out fragments of their very soul - usually not the whole thing, but frequently a large chunk of it. This lets them replace their own ever-degrading souls, while also living hundreds of even thousands of years with enough victims. Of course, having no allegiance except themselves, vampires will even stab each other in the back, feeding on other vampires or even on other undead. Untold amounts of workers and citizens have been lost to the Necrocracy in past vampire epidemics - one of which even culminated in a vampire trying to feed on me, Mortemia, the great dracolich! For this reason, vampires have been all but banned from the Necrocracy, a point I will elaborate on later.

[...]

As I have previously mentioned, vampires have a bizarre and thoroughly nonsensical array of intrinsic magical properties, as follows:

Aversion to Sunlight: Whatever twisted abuse of necromancy created the vampires also made them so averse to heat and bright light that they will outright begin to melt when left out in the sun. This is probably why they constantly try to flock to the ever-clouded Necrocracy of Strasidel, where I must reiterate they are not welcome.

Soul Copying: For some reason, vampires tend to take on the characteristics of the creatures they feed on. This becomes especially notable when a vampire manages to feed on a dragon without being incinerated or frozen on the spot. Of course, it also ruins their ability to blend in with the living if they aren’t careful, which is kind of all they had going for them.

Degradation: Vampiric souls degrade faster than typical undead souls, probably because of all the extra magic tacked on by vampirism. Because of this, they have to consume souls fairly regularly.

Smokeform?: For some reason, vampires are able to turn themselves into smoke, which lets them fly through the air unnoticed. Or get blown around and scattered if there’s a strong wind, but they usually manage to get back in one piece again. Unfortunately.

Infection: Vampires are unable to procreate (thank the hypothetical gods), so they have to do things a different way. Once they’ve drained away part of a mortal’s soul, they can then regurgitate the corrupt part back into the mortal, like a revolting, undead mother bird to its children. This has one of two effects. Either the mortal is killed outright, or it becomes another vampire. Usually the former.

Resilience: There are far more ways to kill a vampire than the standard “stake n’ behead” method taught in most Strasidel schools. However, they are fairly tough to kill - no doubt, whoever made vampires was jealous of liches but not good enough at necromancy to become one. As such, vampires can have much of their physical bodies destroyed without dying outright, and can even regenerate themselves by draining their souls more quickly. Fortunately, their souls are still contained within their bodies, and proper destruction of the body will kill them for good.

Politeness: For reasons I can’t begin to fathom, vampires can’t enter anywhere private without being invited in first. Whoever first create vampires must have been exceedingly polite, with regards to exactly one social convention. I have no desire to research this further.

[...]

In short, vampires are something akin to lesser liches, with far less regard for anything except for themselves. They can barely even hold their own clans together, let alone form alliances with others, and they cause mass devastation among any population they spread through unchecked. Those in at-risk areas are advised to watch out for people using tricky language to get an invitation into one’s home, and to never believe anyone who claims to be the offspring of two genetically incompatible species.

V. POLTERGEISTS

[...]
Reply
04-01-2016, 08:22 PM
Post: #94
RE: Spheres of Influence
Excerpt out of 'Forbidden Schools of the Arcane Chapter Chapter 15: The Unseen and other Magical Aberrations

A detail that 'mages' seem to forget is that magical energies ALWAYS have effects that are not immediately clear nor apparent at first...maybe even ever! That does not mean they are not there! Keep that in mind or you'll end up meeting or even becoming one of these....or a dire men and that's awful. So get yourself checked after 'experimenting'

The Unseen
Kind of a blanket term for a variety of creatures and phenomenons who's forms trough a magical process became incorporeal and thus not entirely visible to the mortal eye, Notable examples are wraiths, living shadows and lost lights, but it can also be applied to inanimate objects that are possessed by such a spirit, Unseen seem to be in a constant state of flux between this existence and whatever arcane place they were subjected too.

Wraiths Wraiths fall under the most intelligent type of the unseen, These were once mortal creatures that trough some processes were exposed to a incredible amount of magic. So much that their very physical being collapsed into itself and literally became more arcane then flesh and bone in a similar way of the famous 'ghost limb' affliction, This ultimately results in them being invisible to the normal sight but still able too interact with the physical world. Most wraiths circumvent this by wearing heavy robes or armor but they are capable without.

What is most interesting about a Wraith is that their soul is tethered to a plane beyond the physical realm and is usually brimming with arcane power making it highly difficult to obtain but also highly desirable, maybe even impossible for smarter wraiths... The high density of the arcane within the soul also makes wraiths live far beyond a mortal lifespan.. It it even said they cannot be truly killed only dispersed and banished until their body reforms again. I myself do not particularly subscribe to that theory however, Since wraiths are arcane beings they could not function without magic within their being, I might be possible to kill a wraith by draining all the arcane out of its form and its soul, reducing it to nothing.

A wraith can be seen for how it truly looks when one manages to see the magic holding it together... i have not heard of any recorded case but i assume it would look horrifying for they have been alive far longer then they should have been. Wraiths usually retain sentience but we do not know if they answer to anything or anyone.

Being a Arcane being, They need a constant source of magic energy to sustain themselves.. or have a particularly powerful 'benefactor' whom they reward with unwavering and unrepentant loyalty

Lost-Light Nefarious magical phenomenon that take the shape of balls of light flocking together. they debilitate the minds of anyone who wanders within their area, usually one with plenty of natural hazards. They seem to lure people by granting 'visions' of things they are looking for, be it treasure, the right path or even their traveling companions and lure them off the beaten path and into their deaths and then they feed upon the soul of the unfortunate victim, and if magically inclined they feed of that too. Luckily their lifespan is very short but they also form quickly.

When dealing with these 'Lights' to stay within a group and forcibly snap anyone back to reality if they begin to look like they are dosing off or staring into infinity (much like the students of my classes)

Living Shadows Like the name suggests these creatures appear as living shadows creeping among the ground and while having not more then base animal instinct they seem to have a grasp on the arts of illusion. These creatures prey on emotions usually fear and despair and try to drive people into it. Their method is quite insidious. they hide within the shadows of their prey and begin to influence their perception of the world. A great adventure suddenly might end in tragedy and loss, a happy family suddenly tears each other apart, They read their prey's mind and make their worst nightmares seemingly come true! So if you see your shadow not quite move in sync with you... Stab it and the horrors will pass... Usually if things didn't really fuck up.

[...]

Now you'd be asking mister author wizard! Wasn't this book about magical schools? and you would be right, now shut it and keep reading, What all these unseen have in common is that they all make use of a offshoot mixture of the psionic and illusion schools of magic, Wraiths in particular are skilled at this magic. it is theorized some of those wraiths were the origin of those schools in particular but that is wildly unproven.

And because it is mentioned in this book i might add that this way of magic is forbidden just like the rest of the examples out of this book, So if you really really want to learn it. Go seek a wraith that doesn't kill you immidiately.
Reply
04-02-2016, 09:31 AM
Post: #95
RE: Spheres of Influence
Alright, that's the end of independent fluff! The game will be starting soon.
Reply
04-02-2016, 10:22 AM
Post: #96
RE: Spheres of Influence
READ THIS: HOW GAMEPLAY IS GONNA WORK
Yes, that means you, people who have played states games before! I'm adopting an actual structure to the waltz of nations, and it'll help you out to actually know what's going on.

Turns: There will be two kinds of turns that will alternate. There are the shorter open turns, alternating with the long-term turns.

The open turns will probably be the bulk of the game. They are your usual states-game experience of replying to freeform PMs, except instead of being a fixed year in length, they represent a collection of important moments happening in that time. On these turns you don't need to worry about long-term planning, but rather take the time to focus on diplomacy, conferences and imperialism. During the course of the open turn, you may receive new update PMs referencing other people's actions that may interest you, which you have the chance to respond to. The turn will continue until everyone has had a chance to respond. If countries are engaged in a bitter back and forth over some issue, it could end up becoming intractable, leading to it still being an issue when the next open turn rolls around.

The long-term turn that follows will be for letting events play out and developing your country. The wars you've started will play out and you will have a chance to implement strategies to improve whatever aspects of your country you want, from building roads to upgrading the army. During these long-term turns, you can't start new wars or cause a diplomatic crisis - you do it in the open turn beforehand, or wait until the next one. Once all the long-term responses are submitted, the game proceeds forward several years to see their effects, and a new open turn begins.

Wars: Wars, being the tricky things that tend to bog down the game that they are, will be handled differently this time around. Instead of making players micromanage their armies, they simply have to state in their PMs that they are declaring war and indicate what the objective is. If they want more control, they can draw or write a battleplan indicating what they want accomplished in what order. The troops on the ground will attempt to achieve the objective or follow the battleplan - once the other players have had a chance to react to your aggression. (It might be worth informing some of them about it beforehand, to get some kind of diplomatic support for your invasion to deter other major players from intervening.)

Diplomacy: Diplomacy is accomplished by two methods - direct messages, public proclamations and conferences. Direct messages are just PMs you send to another player - when doing so, remember to always include the GM (me) as a recipient. Public proclamations and conferences are just posting in the thread. Public proclamations are you shouting something to the world at large, while conferences are group discussions about some issue or other that have to actually be called somewhere in the world and can get pretty RP-heavy. If you attend a conference, try to have fun and not get super stressed!

Superweapons: The use of superweapons is not to be taken lightly, as they are big, loud, and deadly. However, in the event that someone does push the red button, I will signal as such in the thread. In this event, all discussion both in-game and out about the deployment of superweapons is to stop, regardless of alliance status or need to explain yourself, until after all superweapons have hit their targets. Superweapons being used are easily detected, though their target cannot normally be detected until the weapon actually reaches its destination and goes off. In short, people will be notified that X person has fired off their superweapon, and be given a chance to fire their own before they are (potentially) wiped off of the map.

As you can see, there is a large multilateral potential for Mutually Assured Destruction, so make sure people know what you are doing BEFORE you deploy superweapons, and try to refrain from using them around people nervous of your intentions. Also bear in mind that every time multiple superweapons are fired in sequence, there is a very small chance of it destroying the world, increasing as more of the world's weapons are fired (but never to 100%). Try not to kill yourselves all the same.

My next post will be the first game post.
Reply
04-05-2016, 02:51 PM (This post was last modified: 08-25-2016 05:23 PM by Demonsul.)
Post: #97
RE: Spheres of Influence
1351 countries:
High Kingdom of Ahsar
Government:
Elective Monarchy
Ruler Name:
High King John IX Haelaw
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
56
Capital:
Borova
Ruler Race:
Mun
Ruled by a king elected on the death of his predecessor in a grand meeting of all the lords, the high kingdom would be a constitutional monarchy if the parliament met more regularly. However, the power of the parliament tends to limit the ambitions of its kings. The high kingdom is known for its horsemanship, most proudly exhibited through their heavy lancer cavalry that are universally feared by more mundane armies. Their forces also feature disciplined line infantry and mage support, though they have nothing out of the ordinary.

Principality of Somilla
Government:
Parliamentary Monarchy
Ruler Name:
Prince Maren II Yoreus
Race(s):
Mun, Kethul
Ruler Age:
44
Capital:
Somilla
Ruler Race:
Mun
A culturally distinct and moderately wealthy principality wedged between Ahsar, Rudahog and the Old Hills. They protect their independence with a firm alliance with Ahsar. The Mun have a maritime tradition and make excellent sailors, while the Kethul are much like any you might find in the Old Hills, except mildly less xenophobic. Its southern mountains are unusually rich in minerals.

Deep Hall of Dolgothur
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
Queen Kyaz Stelírm
Race(s):
Kethul
Ruler Age:
63
Capital:
Dolgothur
Ruler Race:
Kethul Dreg
Much like any dwarven state you might find in the Old Hills, Dolgothur mostly keeps to its own devices and is relatively distrusting of outsiders. Most of their settlements are subterranean, making them highly resistant to invasion. They are known to dwell on top of a deep silver mine.

March of Mytil
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
Margrave Hanimir Gulisk
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
38
Capital:
Mytil
Ruler Race:
Mun
A quasi-independent satellite state of Ahsar, the March of Mytil was formed initially to protect against incursions from the necromantic lands to the north. It is largely autonomous in its affairs, though it and Ahsar always join each other's wars as if they were the same country. It is known for the great fortress that protects its capital.

Egalitarian Republic of Faralon
Government:
Republican Directorate
Ruler Name:
Jean Heureux
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
33
Capital:
Faralon
Ruler Race:
Mun
Faralonia was once an empire that spanned mountains, though multiple revolutions over the centuries have given many territories the chances they needed to secede, and more recently opened the way for conquerors to take parts of their land that broke away. Now under the control of Director Heureux of les Enragés, the bloated city-state exports revolutionary zeal and instability to surrounding countries.

Kingdom of Rezhnov
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Vladimir II Kurovik
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
45
Capital:
Skarstok
Ruler Race:
Mun
Initially a breakaway state from Faralonia during its first round of disintegrating revolutions, Rezhnov reinforced its independence by seizing additional Faralonian territories in later wars. Though culturally similar to Kalvesiyan, Rezhnovian is its own identity, with less of a focus on familial tribalism and cossack influences and more of an aristocratic focus, which has granted them powerful cavalry following the Ahsar model.

City of Korov
Government:
City-State Republic
Ruler Name:
Yelena Bavolya
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
63
Capital:
Korov
Ruler Race:
Mun
Korov was a Faralonian breakaway state in league with Rezhnov during their battle for independence from Faralonia, though soon after their independence was achieved they made it clear they intended to remain independent. Due to the close friendship between their leaders at the time, this was achieved, and ever since there has been a cordial relationship with the Kingdom of Rezhnov. Korov itself is known for its elite infantry that can fight both with firearms and in melee with swords.

Fault
Government:
City-State Dictatorship
Ruler Name:
Fault
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
?
Capital:
Fault's Keep
Ruler Race:
Patriarch
A single humble keep and a couple of small, distant villages. Fault has no military force to speak of. Nonetheless, Fault is mysteriously left well enough alone by its neighbours, no matter how aggressive they might be. Those who have been, at times in the past, adamant about even the smallest attack have either changed their mind overnight, never speaking of why, or vanished without a trace or any sign of foul play.

Pulovian Cossacks
Government:
Cossack Hetmanate
Ruler Name:
Hetman Ivan
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
43
Capital:
Pulov
Ruler Race:
Mun
The semi-nomadic cossacks of the western steppe pay tribute to powerful neighbours as it pleases them, never quite acknowledging anyone as their eternal overlord but rather throwing their lot in with whoever will let them loot the juiciest targets. If nobody's offering, they'll just loot whoever they can ride to, and they can ride exceptionally far.

Kingdom of Teralon
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Aron III Maloren
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
57
Capital:
Kilney
Ruler Race:
Mun
Teralon is a xenophobic kingdom nestled in a verdant mountain valley. Largely a mystery to its surrounds, it denies almost all travellers and traders passage through its borders, restricting access only to a trusted few. Teralonians are almost never seen outside their borders. That their strange religious traditions involve a great serpent named Nesariet and that their king may be a powerful magic user are all that most outsiders know about them.

Tamvaria
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
Duke Mordren Dylarr
Race(s):
Elvar, Mun
Ruler Age:
42
Capital:
Filyir
Ruler Race:
Elvar
Tamvaria is an independent duchy near the upper reaches of Rudahog. It is a large expanse of mediocre farmland, though the Elvar artisans of Filyir are known for their skill in stoneworking. The Duchy is allied with Sovelia and Basvia in a three-way alliance to protect them from the dark armies of Rudahog.

Duchy of Sovelia
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
Duchess Amali II Suvil
Race(s):
Elvar
Ruler Age:
36
Capital:
Treimi
Ruler Race:
Elvar
The deep forests of Sovelia, sandwiched between powerful neighbours, are the defences they fall back on in case of invasion. They are known for their skill in archery, even though gunpowder rules the day in most modern armies. The Duchy is allied with Tamvaria and Basvia in a three-way alliance to protect them from the dark armies of Rudahog.

Duchy of Dol Duran
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
Duke Rikod Mareton
Race(s):
Mun, Elvar
Ruler Age:
49
Capital:
Durelid
Ruler Race:
Mun
A duchy very keen on maintaining its own independence in spite of extremely low defensibility and a position lodged between greater powers. Easy to conquer but hard to hold, it might be better to turn it into a client state.

Kingdom of Pezda
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Orid II Ialati
Race(s):
Mun, Elvar
Ruler Age:
32
Capital:
Pezda
Ruler Race:
Mun
The people here have a distinct cultural identity, with frequent festivals and a unique type of local theater. They are culturally brothers and sisters of Zachaza, though the royal families of the two monarchies have feuded for generations. Pezda is further south and has a larger army than Zachaza.

Kingdom of Zachaza
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Baraz of Zachaza
Race(s):
Mun, Elvar
Ruler Age:
45
Capital:
Zachaza
Ruler Race:
Elvar
The people here have a distinct cultural identity, with frequent festivals and a unique type of local theater. They are culturally brothers and sisters of Pezda, though the royal families of the two monarchies have feuded for generations. Zachaza is closer to the frozen north and has a larger proportion of frost elves among its population than Pezda.

Kingdom of Atelmour
Government:
Parliamentary Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Lorensen Yuvo
Race(s):
Mun, Valtir, Kethul
Ruler Age:
58
Capital:
Airid
Ruler Race:
Mun
A culturally disunited kingdom. The mountains are full of disparate Kethul settlements which are largely autonomous and like it that way, while the lowlands are full of Mun and Valtir living in communities, each with an elected member of parliament. The king still holds a lot of real power, but is limited by the parliament. The kingdom has a democratic tradition copying from that of Eorela, although with much less representation of minority interests.

Four Kingdoms of Sydnenia
Government:
Absolute Monarchies
Ruler Name:
-
Race(s):
Valtir, Elvar, Mun
Ruler Age:
-
Capital:
Seiden, Canen, Vadren, Laeren
Ruler Race:
-
Four kings ruling five of the major islands in an archipelago of six. They mostly just want to be protected against outside threats, and largely protect each other's independence. The four royal families are closely related to one another.

Septduran
Government:
Tribal Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Victor Tyveni
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
36
Capital:
Sevirin
Ruler Race:
Mun
A tribal kingdom formed to unite the clans of the mountains, originally against the dark empire that was conquered by Herinhia. Their lands are poor, they distrust outsiders, and their population density is low. Led by Victor, the warrior king who has the respect of all the clans.

Kingdom of Basvia
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
Queen Ilrona Yuvo
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
43
Capital:
Bas
Ruler Race:
Mun
The lands of this kingdom are not especially wealthy or poor, but the coasts are rich with fish, sponges and other maritime wealth. The kingdom also allows free passage to all pilgrims and philosophers on their way to the Heart of the World, the great mountain to their south around which the heavens appear to revolve. The Kingdom is allied with Sovelia and Tamvaria in a three-way alliance to protect them from the dark armies of Rudahog.

Kingdom of Theaxia
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Otho of Salz
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
32
Capital:
Theax
Ruler Race:
Mun
This maritime kingdom is spread across many islands. Its army is a joke, but its navy is not to be trifled with and they would make a strong maritime ally. The only problem is that they are proud and patriotic, and their king is short-sighted, selfish and belligerent.

Theocracy of Stitorika
Government:
Clerical Theocracy
Ruler Name:
Hierophant Aegir IX
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
65
Capital:
Vaicita
Ruler Race:
Mun
A maritime theocracy that follows some strange otherworldly god. The high-ranking clerics of this faith are blessed with otherworldly power, and bring it to the battlefield without hesitation. Even so, the theocracy is only expansionist in its drive to bring the light of the true faith to other people, and is not an aggressor against those who refuse to convert of their own accord.

Kingdom of Gizarth
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Azurig Kokolmon
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
47
Capital:
Zazith
Ruler Race:
Mun
A kingdom with inwards-focused culture and backwards technology, Gizarth was isolated on the ocean for centuries. Aside from the occasional lost ship, none made landfall on the island for a long time as it slowly moved by unknown process around the world. Now it has been 'discovered' and properly located on a map, that is sure to change.

Kingdom of Suidia
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Goarus of Byirin
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
38
Capital:
Ulairin
Ruler Race:
Mun
A militaristic kingdom with proud armies in a human-dominated part of the world. They are known for the red and white banners depicting a wild boar that fly from every pennant and standard carried by their armies. They are somewhat xenophobic against non-humans, though that is mostly down to lack of exposure to such people.

Kingdom of Yayovey
Government:
Monarchy/Military Dictatorship
Ruler Name:
King Davor II Neis
Race(s):
Mun, Kethul
Ruler Age:
44
Capital:
Kelka
Ruler Race:
Mun
Though ruled by a king who officially rules the country, in reality the Kingdom of Yayovey is a dictatorship ruled by Simeon Savomir, Marshal of the Army. The country is in a dilapidated state, with most infrastructure being old and underfunded. Though the country sports a large professional army, the officer corps has collapsed into decadence after becoming the chief political power, and leadership is abysmal, leading to the recent challenges to their hegemony. They used to rule everything between Suidia and Zun, after all.

Kingdom of Balzaha
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
Queen Nikolena Zepev
Race(s):
Mun, Kethul
Ruler Age:
37
Capital:
Uriz
Ruler Race:
Mun
Balzaha rebelled and gained independence from Yayovey around a generation ago. Ever since, their biggest threat has not been decadent Yayovey, but their belligerent neighbour Trellemak. Their culture was not entirely liberated during the rebellion, and they have a majority in the Yayovey land across the border north and east of them. They are allied to Vaikarika.

Principality of Vaikarika
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Obrad Babukov
Race(s):
Mun
Ruler Age:
34
Capital:
Sorgrade
Ruler Race:
Mun
Vaikarika rebelled and gained independence from Yayovey around a generation ago. However, their rebellion was mostly crushed by Yayovey, and they only gained partial independence as a concession to end the revolt – most of their cultural kin remain controlled by Yayovey, living in the area to their east south of the mountains. They are allied to Balzaha for their mutual protection against both Yayovey and Trellemak.

Kingdom of Trellemak
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Petro Kolokov
Race(s):
Mun, Kethul
Ruler Age:
37
Capital:
Tevrad
Ruler Race:
Mun
Vaikarika rebelled and gained independence from Yayovey around a generation ago. They were the main force during the multicultural rebellion, and managed to liberate their entire culture – and they even 'liberated' a little extra from another culture as part of the peace deal. The king is a tyrant, and his harsh taxes and strict controls pay for a small but powerful army, supported by a sizeable group of arcane battlemages.

City of Izantin
Government:
City-State Republic
Ruler Name:
Dozh Mladen Stomanov
Race(s):
Mun, Kethul
Ruler Age:
51
Capital:
Izantin
Ruler Race:
Kethul
Izantin is a neutral city-state that has long maintained its independence from Yayovey by means of canny diplomacy, though with the decline of Yayovey they have had less need of this in more recent years. A multicultural mix of all surrounding cultures, the city-state is a nexus of trade and wealth, and the city itself is splendid to behold. A small force of elite guards is supplemented with enough wealth to hire an entire mercenary army, should the need arise.

Kingdom of Senobela
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Iksander Fuqishem
Race(s):
Mun, Kethul
Ruler Age:
67
Capital:
Aranta
Ruler Race:
Mun
Senobela rebelled and gained independence from Yayovey around a generation ago. They joined the ongoing revolt against their overlords when it was clear the revolt started by the more southerly states was going well. Their king, Iksander, was the one who achieved their independence, and is known as a shrewd and opportunistic man. They have an unusually close relationship between Mun and Kethul in their lands, and both serve in their armies with almost equal regularity.

Deep Halls of Underzweig
Government:
Mysterious Council
Ruler Name:
?
Race(s):
Kethul
Ruler Age:
?
Capital:
Underzweig
Ruler Race:
Kethul?
A diplomatically open Kethul state buried in the western mountains on the very border of the heartlands. Trades freely with its neighbours and those who arrive by sea or river, though nobody knows exactly who rules the state or what their ultimate ambitions are.

Kingdom of Alamidia
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
Queen Szehek III Rithir
Race(s):
Valtir, Mun
Ruler Age:
15
Capital:
Aisamekh
Ruler Race:
Valtir
One of the desert kingdoms of the near southwest, Alamidia is known for the bizarre desert beasts that serve in their armies as well as for controlling most of the green territory on this side of the sands. Though mostly autocratic, the coronation of a girl queen six years ago installed a regent, Vokhor Rithir, cousin of the queen, who has effectively been the real ruler ever since.

Kingdom of Shivida
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
Queen Sahz II Bissirk
Race(s):
Valtir
Ruler Age:
63
Capital:
Brez
Ruler Race:
Valtir
One of the desert kingdoms of the near southwest, Shivida is mostly a barren wasteland. Most of the population is semi-nomadic, with permanent settlements around the capital and its groundwater wells, the river in the southwest and the mountains, which contain rich veins of gold that fund most of the royal expenses.

Kingdom of Alyutaria
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
King Alhaz Sassud
Race(s):
Valtir
Ruler Age:
36
Capital:
Vokadh
Ruler Race:
Valtir
One of the desert kingdoms of the near southwest, Alyutaria is mostly a barren wasteland. Aside from a small navy of a few frigates that protect their fishing boats, they don't have much of a professional army at all, though conquering the desert is an imposing task in and of itself.

Kingdom of Ulbarida
Government:
Absolute Monarchy
Ruler Name:
Queen Szehek Silsyk
Race(s):
Valtir
Ruler Age:
40
Capital:
Kussat
Ruler Race:
Valtir
One of the desert kingdoms of the near southwest, Ulbarida clusters its settlements around the river Ulbar. The farms around the river are highly fertile, making it the second most populous of the near southwest's kingdoms. Like its larger neighbour Alamidia, its armies contain many strange desert beasts. Said beasts make up a greater proportion of its comparatively smaller armies.

1351 A.T.

[World Map]
[Cities Map]


And so it came to pass that the great powers of the Heartlands became increasingly advanced, and their rulers came to hold an unprecedented amount of power. The superweapons they armed themselves with had yet to be turned against one another, but all of them recognized the danger that each other posed, though they might not have truly grasped the extent of the damage they could cause. But all around them, stretching off to the horizon, opened up the world.

To the northwest, a vast empire had already emerged, sprawling over empty land. At its head was a dragon, clad in golden scales, head raised, staring out across the land. Under his guidance, dragonkind had taken its rightful place as rulers of this land. Now, for wealth, power and glory, this empire needed to grow.

To the south, an ancient republic, steeped in tradition, carried a moral burden of enlightenment. They held high the torch of their democratic traditions, and many in the world could only envy the light it cast. Some in their great parliament thought it was their duty to go out and rule the world, and free its people from the chains they did not know bound them.

To west, fields of wheat, rolling plains of gold, greet the eye. The Stalwart Republic would forever hold against the darkness of the Mortenwood. Its farmers were diligent and brave, proud of their nation and of each other. The world was full of people who just plumb didn't have the common sense they all had, after all.

In the hills and valleys that fell under the shadow of the obsidian tower, dire men were learning the meaning of society. The Steward was never seen, yet his presence was felt everywhere, and even the dimmest of those wiry forms recognized that something was changing in the wind. Things were changing, and soon they would find themselves wholly taken by this new master.

In the city in the shadow of the mountain Aradel, there was an impending sense in the air. For a generation they had lived freely in the city and its surrounds, and had grown attached to the place, the free city where ideas went to flower and bloom. They had faith that whatever was about to change, the dragon would guide them through it as he always had.

In the dark and broken land of Rudahog, the people were recovering from the devastation of ages past and the purges of the last decade. Order had finally been restored, and the land was united, in a way it hadn't been in hundreds of years. The world would no longer look upon Rudahog and shake their heads in despair – now they would watch with trepidation and fear.

On the roads throughout the continent, the Amaro caravans travelled with smile and song. They had never been tied down, not even when they established their shining city. Under the aegis of protection that city and its council had brought, they'd developed into an even more vibrant society, now they feared their neighbours no more.

In the high halls of the emerald palace of Arcavat, the true leader of the land mused on the future. The Heartlands had risen high, putting most of the rest of the world to shame as a result of their splendour. But the rest of the world was still rich in resources, and the manufactories of Arcavat were always hungry for more.

In the frozen caverns under Strasidel, the dracolich who had built this society of the dead from the ground up stared into a pool that glittered, which was somehow simultaneously white and black. Here were the secrets she sought, if she could only unlock them. But the outside world would take a different effort to unravel indeed.

In the palace of the Outremarian, the King of Paladins, grey banners hung either side of the throne. He was facing a problem those that had preceded him had never predicted, and the clearest solution was an expansion of the state into new lands. It would be a new crusade, one not against an evil empire, but for an empire of good.

All around them, the Heartland teemed with its own activity, though in their positions wedged between these great powers, the less powerful nations could not chart their destiny alone. They knew they would need to ally with one power or be consumed by another. But beyond them, the world stretched out, unaware of the changing times. The old kings had yet to realize that soon, there would be new rulers, and they would be glorious and terrible to behold.
Reply
04-05-2016, 04:15 PM
Post: #98
RE: Spheres of Influence
Notice:

Zo claims rulership over the unclaimed island just off of the southeastern Heartlands.
Reply
04-05-2016, 04:24 PM (This post was last modified: 04-05-2016 04:24 PM by Protoman.)
Post: #99
RE: Spheres of Influence
The Amaro Zor also respectfully lays claim that island, contesting the claim of the people of Arcavat. We would like to open diplomatic channels so that we might resolve this cordially and ensure lasting and eternal friendship with Zo, the great and mighty.
Reply
04-05-2016, 04:37 PM (This post was last modified: 04-05-2016 04:41 PM by Bramzter.)
Post: #100
RE: Spheres of Influence
Andúr invokes a claim on the southern peninsula beyond the great forest of Mortenwood.
Reply


Forum Jump: