Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
07-27-2016, 01:50 AM (This post was last modified: 08-05-2016 05:03 AM by The O Fan.)
Post: #1
Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
What is microscope? Its a community rp game that may as well have been custom made for us. Rather than mechanics or rolling, its a game built on collaborative world-building where every player is equal and you can do anything. Pulling a direct quote:

All of us participating in this game have equal creative power. At times we'll have different roles and authority, but we're all equal participants and authors.


To start a new game, we will follow the four steps outlined below to set some initial parameters:
Determine the big picture - a brief, one sentence overview of the history that we will create and experience.
Establish the bookends of history - the absolute start and absolute end of where we intend to explore
Define the palette of narrative ingredients: what should be in the game? What should be BANNED from the game?
Begin the first pass of Microscope!
---

With regards to SA for these rules

Explanation of Play
One we have finished the first four steps of setup, we'll be ready to start a proper session of play. Arriving at this point, we should already know more about our history than we did when we determined the big picture, and as we play we'll find out more and more.

The basic structure of the game is that we will keep going around in player order adding to the tableau of history, making either a Period, an Event, or a Scene. For each rotation, there will be one player called the LENS, and that player will pick the FOCUS that everything following players create must relate to.

Example: If the FOCUS is a city, each player (including the LENS) is going to get to add something that somehow relates to that specific city. It's a topic to keep us all on the same page.

If you make a Period or Event, just describe what happens as though we're seeing it from a bird's eye view. When it's your turn, you're in charge, and the rest of the players (and spectators!) will be eagerly waiting to see what you have to say.

Example: It is my turn, and the FOCUS is a specific city. I create a Period where the city is flourishing in an age of prosperity. However, the next player creates an Event within the new period I just made, which levels the city in a terrible calamity.

If you make a Scene, we all pick characters and play to find out what really happened during that moment of history. Scenes are special; they invite other players to come participate directly with you to answer a Question.

Example: On a player's turn, they raise a Scene that takes place during the aforementioned calamity. They pose a question to the group: "Was the calamity caused by people?" They then set the scene, and players act using characters to find out the answer to the Question.


Getting into the Microscope Mindset

History does not turn out the way a single person intended in Microscope; there will be things that people create that go nowhere, or events that nobody else likes. However, what other players add to the tableau of history may surprise you; likewise, your own additions will probably surprise them as well.

You may find that you do not have any ideas that seem particularly appealing, or end up fairly dry when it's your turn. This is fine; even though you may play something that you personally don't feel happy with, there is a good chance other players may see something in the idea and refine it through play that will ultimately validate your 'boring' idea.

Caveats about Microscope

You may find as a new player you have a lot of really great ideas and you can't wait to tell people about them. However, it's strongly encouraged to treat Microscope like poker - you want to keep your cool ideas close to your chest until you're ready to use them in actual play. If everybody else knows what you intend ahead of time, it takes out some of the mystique and maybe some of what makes the idea interesting in the first place.

Unlimited Power in Limited Context

Remember that when it's your turn, if you are playing an Event or Period, that is something you have complete control over. Nobody else can change that point of history, but they can ask for clarification. You also cannot ask for feedback from other players in any way - this is purely your creation. It may be shaped and informed from other player's work, or it may go in a new direction. Understanding your restrictions and working with maximum effect in that area is something new players will want to address and subsequently embrace.

Guidelines About Events and Periods

Try to avoid being vague. The gallery is allowed to ask for clarification when a player is describing something. This is not considered a veto; nobody is allowed to veto a creation unless it breaks the rules. However, it is important that everybody is able to clearly visualize what happens in the history, so people can build off of it later. If you're stuck, describe what someone would see from a bird's eye view of the action, like in a long panning shot or montage in a movie.
If you describe the start of a situation but not its conclusion, remember that this ties into the above - clearly define the conclusion.
Do not collaborate or make polls.
Do not allow other players to give you suggestions. Do not give other players suggestions.
When it is your turn, it's your turn, nobody else's. You make what you want to make with absolute authority.

Guidelines About Scenes

The primary purpose of a scene is to answer the Question posed when the scene has begun. As soon as the Question has been answered, play stops even if it is in the middle of action. If desired, the next person can use their turn to come up with a new Scene with a new Question that immediately follows the one that just ended.
In a five player environment sometimes it is more appropriate to have people pass on being in a scene, or to represent something in the background rather than a principal character. Someone can also choose to represent Time in the scene.
Limit things to your character's perspective, but reveal new details about the world through their eyes. Example: a guard may feel a tremor in the ground and think nothing of it, though this could be a moleman invasion preparing to attack. In this example, the player who represents the guard should only reveal the tremors and the guard's emotions surrounding it - they are unaware of a moleman attack.

To start a new game, we will follow the four steps outlined below to set some initial parameters:
>Determine the big picture - a brief, one sentence overview of the history that we will create and experience.
>Establish the bookends of history - the absolute start and absolute end of where we intend to explore
>Define the palette of narrative ingredients: what should be in the game? What should be BANNED from the game?
Begin the first pass of Microscope!


0.1 - The Big Picture

In any order, people can throw out ideas here that is one line. It should be a single sentence that summarizes what happens but leaves out all the details. It is okay to collaborate and find an idea that everybody is happy with. This will help to make sure you're on the same page about the kind of game everybody wants to play. Note, however, that this is one of the only times that it is okay to collaborate. Once we've settled on a big picture we can move on to the next step.


Some ideas I am throwing out

>The history of a world full of magic and many races and there factions and clashes

Something like Avatar, Tarkir, Westeros, Middle Earth, Narnia, Doom's Battleworld or the like with a bunch of different civilizations all bouncing off each others back , with Vampire barons in the North clashing with Goblin Khans

Or we could do an epic space opera tons of different alien races and cultures with a massive history

Perhaps zoom closer? The life and times of one nation or civilization as it shifts and turns through society?

Maybe a superhero universe, either original or based on other properties?

Or an epic myth tinged opera showing the trials and conflicts of the heroes and gods?

What about following the rise and fall of a legendary family? Or a reincarnating hero rising again and again to defend his realm?

A secret order running society from, behind the scenes? An epic cold war of spies and subterfuge? Humans endless conflict against monsters come to eliminate them? A realm were people collect monsters and robots and use them for competitions? An alternate history setting, where the technology and culture of various real world nations is vastly shifted. A mild mannered sitcom following the adventures of a family or office. A mystic kungfu epic? Gothic horror? Ninja Action? A return to one of the classic states games settings? Anything is possible!



Hope to have fun with my first ever time hosting a game here!
:)





Progress Chart

This will be the section devoted to tracking our progress


Big Picture

"In the wake of a massive Civil War, the frontier of a nation is filled with wandering warriors and forces trying to bring order to the wild."

Bookend History


Start Period (dark): A Nation under tense times is on the cusp of being ravaged by a Civil War centered on powerful and noble warriors.


End Period (Dark): The last of the Wandering Warriors dies out as The Nation embraces it's new status as a global empire.





Palette Round 1


Yes
Mister Visceral-Feudal social structure
Vancho1-Gender Equality
Demonsul-Trains
The O Fan-Advanced Combat Skills

In Progress

Palette Round 2

No
Vancho1-Magic
Mister Visceral-Horses

Yes
The O Fan- Social/Ethnic Inequality

Timeline
Period (Dark): A Nation under tense times is on the cusp of being ravaged by a Civil War centered on powerful and noble warriors.
Event (Dark): The Bending of the Baran
Event(Dark): The Slaughter of the Haijones


Period(Light): In the wake of the war, settlers seek new lives on the frontier.

Period(Light): A dozen famous Wandering Warriors roam the lawless frontier at once, heralding a golden age for such Wanderers


Period (Light): The last of the Wandering Warriors dies out as The Nation embraces it's new status as a global empire.
Reply
07-27-2016, 02:41 AM
Post: #2
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
This sounds fun. I'm interested.

"We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire."
-Henry David Thoreau
Reply
07-27-2016, 07:55 AM
Post: #3
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Cool! I'd be interested in participating. Quick question - you mentioned you took the rules from SA, do you have a link to any Microscope games they've played over there so I can see how it works out on a forum (as opposed to irl)?

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
07-27-2016, 08:01 AM
Post: #4
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
I'd totally be interested in joining this. I played it once before in an IRL session, was huge fun even if we got the rules half wrong.
Reply
07-27-2016, 09:45 AM
Post: #5
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Of course!

So any ideas ?
Reply
07-27-2016, 10:06 AM
Post: #6
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Here is that SA thread you rec'd

https://forums.somethingawful.com/showth...genumber=1

Glad to have everyone here, so lets rap about what our setting should be.

Remember, big picture, think logline, no need to front load with pre rp or worldbuilding this is basically a prompt for all of us to flesh out on.

Because I am a slovenly Stan dedciated to nostalgia a riff on city states 1 sounds nice
Reply
07-27-2016, 03:03 PM
Post: #7
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Hm, I feel like the CS1 plot is a bit tired by now. Besides, pretty sure it was none of our best writing, considering the time.

I'd actually like to suggest a more hard, realistic setting. Been having a lot of fantasy around here recently, (Wings, Masks[yes superheroes count as fantasy], Spheres, Time States, my silly little game which I swear I'm going to update tonight for real this time, Frontier Fucked [yes really soft sci-fi counts as fantasy too]). At least, that's my preference at the moment.

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
07-27-2016, 11:02 PM
Post: #8
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
What about a remake of a famous historical war with all the major parties recast as pop stars and the countries as record labels?
Reply
07-29-2016, 10:37 AM
Post: #9
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
How about a gritty Western deal?

"We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire."
-Henry David Thoreau
Reply
07-30-2016, 02:18 AM
Post: #10
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Can it be one of those cool Samurai/Cowboy mashups? I love those
Reply
07-30-2016, 04:14 AM
Post: #11
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
I like the idea of a samurai western. I have two ideas for what it could look like:

1. Western tropes in a feudal Japan setting

2. Samurai in the Wild West

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
07-30-2016, 06:06 AM
Post: #12
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
East Vs West Hmm?

i vote for option 2
Reply
07-30-2016, 06:13 AM (This post was last modified: 07-30-2016 06:42 AM by The O Fan.)
Post: #13
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
What about a Big hero 6 style thing where we have an AU setting that is a mix of Edo Japan and and the American old West. A kind of og 1800s mash up universe we could even have foreigners from the United Qingdom and conflict with native Comainuche all dealing with the fall out from the War of the States Period.

becasue of my autism IO have made a name for this hypothetical setting

The Unitedo Teitsu of Amyorika

Teitsu is 帝つ meaning "One Empire/Empire of One" and punning on "States"
Amyorika is 安名理科 meaning "Safe and Named(as in "Noble") Science" and puns on "America"

Both take elements from the Japanese words for Empire (帝国/teikoku) and Feudal State(名田/myoden)

Unitedo of course mixed "United" with "Edo"

Amyorika can also be pronounced Annarika which may roll off the tounge better.

of course Unitedo mixes United and Edo and
Reply
07-30-2016, 12:19 PM (This post was last modified: 07-30-2016 01:10 PM by Vancho1.)
Post: #14
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Woah there, slow down, I was thinking more of a spaghetti western feel, except that some of the gritty antiheroes smoking cigars have swords instead of guns.

EDIT: Going off my own idea, the concept is "Non-isolationist Japan colonizes California", but otherwise pretty similar to OTL, so then you've got samurai in the west along with the cowboys and explorers.

Edit x2: (Spoliered for far too much digging into translations and etymologies.

I'm not going to claim I'm an expert in Japanese, but I'm not really sure your etymology works out from a cursory search of terms. 帝, or "tei/mikado" means Emperor - 国 ("koku/kuni"), or place, country, etc. makes teikoku (帝国) signify "empire". You're also re-using the "i" from "tei" for your "itsu", so I would assume that for clarity you'd insert an 一 before the つ to make sure that people read it as "itsu". 名, as far as I can tell, is usually pronounced "na" or "mei" in the context of names (though it is pronounced myo in some compounds), but the main problem I have with your Amyorika is that it's kind of nonsensical? 安 is, as far as I can tell, rarely used on its own, and when it is it can also mean "cheap". 理科 does indeed mean "science" and is pronounced "rika", but a quick search reveals that it's science in the sense of science as a subject in school, ie science class. A better "science" would be kagaku/shingaku 科学 or rigaku 理学, but of course that doesn't have the reading you want it to. Put together, 安名 translates to "cheap name" and is pronounced yasuna, which is definitely not what you're looking for.

Furthermore, a quick search reveals "亜米利加" as a transliterated America into characters. Sure, it doesn't have a cool double meaning to it (apart from the hilarious Sub-America profit Canada or Asia America Profits Increase), but that's because the characters were picked to sound good and not have an insulting or nonsensical meaning.

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
07-31-2016, 02:55 AM (This post was last modified: 07-31-2016 03:07 AM by The O Fan.)
Post: #15
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
I like you're digging and I appreciate the feedback. While I didnt want to go to DEEP into the background and seasonings behind the choices of terms because I wanted to avoided both pre loading and dumping a bunch of info, I'm glad to walk through it.
Spoilers Below!

So firstly, Japanese is a very etymologically rich language with multiple pronunciations meanings, symbols and origins all intersecting with eachother. This means that Japanese wordplay is a very involved art and also very flexible. Its very easy to port in multiple meanings into almost any term or word created in Japanese, and if you are interested try looking up some of your favorite Japanese media to see how they do it in there own works. Brilliant stuff.

帝一つ

First, while "帝" as in tei is mostly used for "Emperor" it can also be used for "Empire" as well. For example The American Empire of Masamune Shirow's Ghost in the Shell is written as "米帝" or Beitei. The element can also be glossed as "Imperial" or "Imperial America" in that case. The flexibility in form use I see as a feature rather than a bug, since 帝 can also be used for "God(ly)/Heaven(ly)" "One Emperor" can also be seen as "One Empire"/"One God" which I feel is a nice conflation of the American "One Nation Under God' and Japanese "Son of Heaven."

You did actually catch a mistake with the lack of me using 一, grammar and syntax has always been a weakness with my foreign language study and I forgot the need for count terms when doing numbers in Japanese, thanks for the fix.




The reading, kani and pronunciation here is directly pulled from the period term 名田. The Myoden were the holdings of the Daimyo. And the use here is for the direct conflation of the Shogunates break down of the power of the Landed Daimyo and the Post Civil War US's breaking down of the "Slave Power" of the wealthy Plantation Class. "Named" in that context meant that the land itself was named, tied to a specific clan and ruler. "Named Land" run by "Great Names."(Think "Baltimore" "Pennsylvania" or "Maryland" for)



This one brings up the concept of multiple kanji readings. At the time of the Chinese contacts Japan had no written language so they adapted Chinese characters for there own purposes, not unlike the Semitic groups who first used Egyptian Hieroglyphics for there own purposes that evolved into our alphabet. This lead to two primary readings. on'yomi, based on the Chinese pronunciation at the time of adoption, and kun'yomi based on the oral native japanese terms that the Chinese characters were best fit too. There is also the nanori reading pronunciations and readings used specifically for names(applying in this case as the name of a place). I didn't want to delve to far into it because Microscope is usually about playing light and big picture with story details up front, but the idea was to mirror the Chinese influence on Japan with the English influence on the US. Thus chinese based readings akin to america's use of English terms. Furthermore the "yasura" meaning itself is a variant on the "A/An" one. In the same way "Just cause" and "Just 'cause" form a pun because Just>Fair>Correct>Precise>Specific>Only>Merely
"Safe" and "Cheap" conflated via
Safe>Protected>Peaceful>Easy>Cheap
in Japan.

That's why I went with the onyumi/nanori readings, (the later derived from the former even)

理科

While the initial reasoning for selecting this form was for the "rika" pun, it does hold advantages over either 科学 or r 理学. The 理 element parses closest to "order" while the 科 element trend towards "measure." 学 is more like "learning" or "education." So going for 理科 had the "Ordering and measuring the world" as opposed the terms using 学, which as you said gives it a feeling of a classroom, not really what we're going for here. The idea was to capture the general over arching theme of both westerns and samurai films, the conflict between order and wildness. The Shogunate installing order after the warring states period with the Shinokosho, or the Great Conquering the Wild of American Manifest destiny. Think of the natural conflict of law and order in both works. The Vigilante vs the Lawman, the ninjo vs girir conflict, settlement vs the wild. In both time periods you are seeing nations enter the transition into there powerful modern, global and imperial forms by stabilizing and ordering cohesive and total control over the whole of there territory. Before they conquering outward they had to conquer themselves, it's a time of building, of the decline of the last vestiges of the frontier falling away to a string centralized state. So while "Science" was a fun term to use in a "spec-fic" kind of way it was more in the "Lewis and Clark" taming the unknown style than "classroom education."

亜米利加

What you are describing here is ateji, the process in which unrelated Kanji are assembled to form a foreign word. Funny enough a variant of this is how the Japanese written language began, as I said above with the readings. But the reason why I didn't use any ateji is the same reason you pointed out. They are pretty much meaningless. And that gets to my wider point.

As you see from by insanely spergtastic breakdown the idea wasn't to just translate American stuff into Japanese or vice versa, but to actually find the similar elements and unite the together. The final result is something that isn't really American or isn't really Japanese but a unique result that uses similar aspects of both to form something new.

That's what I was thinking of with the 'East West" setting taking two nations of one time period going through very analogous development and cultural shifts and playing them off each other creating a fun original setting still rooted in the real history. What exactly would an American Japanese hybrid mean? What would it be? What would its background be, that's the kinda stuff we would be creating/finding out while playing in a very cool setting and era romanticized by both nations for similar reasons.



Anyway I think things like tech level comes a bit later (like if we what gun swords or steampunk style to be a hard yes or a hard no) when we get into how fantastical we want the setting to be . Right now is more locking down the raw premise. Which I think we have a rough consensus for the East Western.

I personally prefer to go for the hybridized setting rather than a straight riff on the otl. Mostly because Microscope is a more atmospheric based game, its driven by world building and playing with fleshing out the setting. Making it an AU that's BASED on Edo Japan and the Wild West as opposed to putting Samurai in the west or Cowboys in Japan means we can flesh out the world as we want without having to stick totally to irl aspects and concepts and events. Like depending on our point of diversion we would be locked down a lot into what the setting is, but if we make it an original world we can still use those historical elements but in our own way. "Based" on history instead of a direct twist we already have. Also would make it easier to do OC's and original historical events and backgrounds
Reply
07-31-2016, 12:08 PM
Post: #16
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
I think "samurai based in Western USA" is a good jumping off point and agree with Vancho that the appeal here is the spaghetti feel. Some kind of picaresque deal (this is a great medium for it since you can do a lot of longitudinal worldbuilding vis a vis antihero historical figures).

This seems most achievable by giving each "character" their due complexity, avoiding melodrama, etc.

"We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire."
-Henry David Thoreau
Reply
08-01-2016, 12:13 PM
Post: #17
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
I agree with all those broad points, my general I suppose proposal is that we do a setting based on samurai and wild west but not marry ourselves to a variant of the real world. That is instead of "until 18xxx everything is the same as otl" we develop an unique Samurai Cowboy setting where we are free to shape the overall world. So we dont exactly NEED to have a Lincoln, a Grant a Tokugawa or Civil War but we can do our twists and variants on those archtypes. Kinda like how Avatar the Last Airbender wasnt set in Asia but for sure was informed, influenced and based on it and it's history. Or Middle Earth and European Mythology. Or Theros and Greek Mythology.
Reply
08-01-2016, 01:12 PM
Post: #18
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Absolutely up for that. Would also love to see this setting in a Magic set.

"We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire."
-Henry David Thoreau
Reply
08-01-2016, 02:59 PM
Post: #19
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
In that case I propose this as our line.

"In the wake of a massive Civil War, the frontier of a nation is filled with wandering warriors and forces trying to bring order to the wild."

Or something like that.
Reply
08-01-2016, 03:36 PM
Post: #20
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Sure, sounds good.

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
08-01-2016, 04:01 PM
Post: #21
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
In which case I would propose as bookends: "The Civil War begins" at the beginning and "The lifetime of the last wandering warrior" at the end
Reply
08-01-2016, 04:15 PM (This post was last modified: 08-01-2016 04:21 PM by The O Fan.)
Post: #22
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Eh... I was feeling that the era of the Wandering Warriors would begin AFTER the Civil War. They wouldn't be wandering until after the war ended right? And looking at our source material, westerns tend to be postbellum and chanbara tend to be in the Tokugawa era (after the warring states era) I think being "post war" may be a core part of the vibe.
Reply
08-01-2016, 04:16 PM
Post: #23
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
This is true but there could still be space for stuff to happen during the war that explains how they came to be.
Reply
08-01-2016, 04:30 PM
Post: #24
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Good point. I guess its a fencepost thing either way.
Reply
08-01-2016, 05:22 PM
Post: #25
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Well, The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly was set during the war, and that's one of the classic spaghetti westerns.

In any case, I agree with Sul's bookends, sound good.

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
08-01-2016, 11:45 PM (This post was last modified: 08-01-2016 11:47 PM by The O Fan.)
Post: #26
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
I guess we will move on to Palletre then?


I think a main point is the realism level .


I don't think we have to go too fantatsical, like say magical lasers or something but I feel over the top hyper exaggerated sword and gunfighting skills are aproproate.


Like the really good warriors would be Samurai Jack/Vash the Stampede tier .
Reply
08-02-2016, 04:02 AM
Post: #27
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Don't we go in a circle and do a Yes palette and No palette?

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
08-02-2016, 07:24 AM (This post was last modified: 08-02-2016 10:13 AM by The O Fan.)
Post: #28
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Yeah sorry I was a bit frazzled last night. Even beyond that I totally blanked on tone. And got a bit sloppy with step 2 in general here let me post it in.

0.2 -Bookend History

Your history will be divided into Periods. Each Period is a very large chunk
of time, probably decades or centuries.
Describe how your history begins and ends. These are your starting and
ending Periods, the bookends of your history. You’ll add more Periods later
on, but everything will be between these points.

1) Agree on a short description for each Period, just a
few sentences or a paragraph at most, painting a clear
picture of what happens during that time.

2) Decide whether each description is Light or Dark,
whether what happens during that Period is generally
happy or tragic. This is the Tone of each Period. The Tone
of the starting and ending Period do not have to match.

You can describe either Period frst, as you prefer. Sometimes it’s easier to
pick Light or Dark for each Period, then see what ideas emerge.
ex:

Our concept is “mankind leaves the sick Earth behind
and spreads out into the stars.” We decide to have a Light
starting Period and a Dark ending Period.

Start Period (Light): Earth is in sad shape, but mankind
unites to face the challenge and make a new life among
the stars. It’s not easy, but it’s a time of hope and unity.

End Period (Dark): Humanity is scattered across a myriad
of star systems with no central connection or core identity.
Isolated and alone, humanity fades into stagnation.



Start Period (dark): A Nation under tense times is on the cusp of being ravaged by a Civil War centered on powerful and noble warriors.


End Period (Dark): The last of the Wandering Warriors dies out as The Nation embraces it's new status as a global empire.


If we agree on that we can move onto pallet

EDIT: Actually, what do you guys think about having our book ends be just before the start of the war, so that when we play through the game we can explore the causes and background of it for a bit.
Reply
08-02-2016, 12:13 PM
Post: #29
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
I agree on starting just before the civil war.

"We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire."
-Henry David Thoreau
Reply
08-02-2016, 12:20 PM (This post was last modified: 08-02-2016 12:25 PM by The O Fan.)
Post: #30
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
If we have a rough consensus lets move onto Pallette

0.3- Palette–Add or Ban
Ingredients


Next you take a step back and create your history’s Palette. The Palette is a
list of things the players agree to reserve the right to include or, conversely,
outright ban. It gets everyone on the same page about what belongs in the
history and what doesn’t.

Make two columns, one for Yes and one for No:

  1. Each player can add one thing, either a Yes or No. Add something to the Yes column if you think the other players would not expect it to be in the history, but you want to be able to include it. Add something to the No column if you think the other players would expect it to be in the history, but you don’t want it included. Players can go in any order. You don’t have to add anything to the Palette if you don’t want to.


    2. If every player did add something (either a Yes or No),
    repeat step 1: each player has the option to go again. If
    someone opted not to add something, stop: your Palette
    is done. In the end, no player will have added two things
    more than anyone else.


Feel free to discuss and negotiate. No one should be unhappy about what
winds up added or banned on the Palette.

Š If something is in the Yes column, then during the rest of
the game it’s okay to introduce it into the history even if
it doesn’t seem like it fts. You’ve all agreed it belongs.

Š If something is in the No column, it’s never okay to bring
into the game, no matter what. You’ve all agreed it’s not
part of the history.

Even if something is in the Yes column, it doesn’t exist in the history until
someone introduces it in play. Something might be in the Yes column, but
never get used at all.


The Palette is not an exhaustive list of what will be in the history: it’s a list
of exceptions. If something fits the setting (like wizards in a fantasy world),
you probably don’t need to add it to the Yes column because the other
players already expect it. Likewise if something seems really out of place
(like wizards in a science fiction history), you probably do not need to add
it to the No column unless you think other players want to include it. When
in doubt, discuss.

One players puts “habitable worlds” in the No column.
People have to live in artificial habitats, biodomes, space
stations, or ships. Another player asks if terraformed
worlds would be okay, but the first player doesn’t want
that either. The other players decide to go along with it.

Another player adds “aliens” to the Yes column; she’s not
sure the other players want aliens in this setting, so she
wants to find out now. Other players want to keep space
mysterious, so after some discussion a different player
adds “communication with aliens” to the No column.
There may turn out to be aliens in the game, but there will
be no way to talk to them.


The Palette is your last chance to freely negotiate and build group consensus
about your history. Your choices tell the other players what kind of game
you want to play, helping you avoid bad surprises and misunderstandings
later on. If there’s a big disagreement about the kind of things you want in
your history, now’s the time to find out and talk about it.
Reply
08-02-2016, 02:11 PM
Post: #31
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Yes
-Feudal social structure


No

"We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire."
-Henry David Thoreau
Reply
08-02-2016, 10:39 PM
Post: #32
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Yes: Advanced Combat Skills

Like I said earlier nothing too insane. but these guys should have the kinds of skills you see in Martial Arts flicks or tv shows. Kill Bill, Samurai Jack, Trigun, Clone Wars without all the force powers.... These guys should be the pinnacle of badassery and combat skill, at least in their hey day.
Reply
08-03-2016, 04:40 AM
Post: #33
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Yes: Gender Equality - It's an alternate universe, so there's no reason for misogyny to be ingrained in the society.

No: Magic - Let's keep this mundane, shall we? I can tolerate over-the-top skills, but nothing overtly supernatural or magical. Just grit.

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
08-03-2016, 07:50 AM (This post was last modified: 08-03-2016 07:56 AM by The O Fan.)
Post: #34
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
re: Your no

That was my thinking too, the idea that this is world were sheer training experience and grit can lead you to do some great things.

Also Vancho you only get one pallet a round, yes or no . Everyone only gets one of each unless we start another round. That means no more yes or nos until Sul picks his. Then when he does anyone else can pick another yes or no to start another round. We keep going until no one has nay yes or nos left.

If everybody wants to we can go doubles (a yes and no per round) but Sul and Visceral havent chosen that yet. So you'll have to pick just the one yes or no
Reply
08-03-2016, 08:03 AM
Post: #35
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
I honestly can't think of anything meaningful to add, so YES to trains.
Reply
08-03-2016, 08:38 AM
Post: #36
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
ah, well, keep the no for this round, and the yes for next round if nobody objects.

The one, the only, Vancho!
Reply
08-03-2016, 01:59 PM
Post: #37
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Ok on to the next round! No need for a set order, as long as every one goes once per round

Yes: Social/Ethnic Inequality

Gender equality is okay, but ethnic and economic tension was a key element of the two settings and genres we are drawing from, between feudalism, slavery, natives and conquest this was a pretty brutal and gritted time. It's not necessary that every one be a bigot, but it's a very uneven society . How it progresses through that is up to us.
Reply
08-04-2016, 04:57 AM
Post: #38
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Updated the OP, awaiting Sul and Mister Visceral's round 2 pallet picks
Reply
08-04-2016, 05:38 AM
Post: #39
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Yeah no I got nothin', so after Visceral we can move on.
Reply
08-04-2016, 05:51 AM
Post: #40
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Oh hey everyone. Here's something to chew on:

No horses, instead everyone rides giant armored beetles.

"We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire."
-Henry David Thoreau
Reply
08-04-2016, 07:15 AM (This post was last modified: 08-04-2016 07:16 AM by The O Fan.)
Post: #41
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Wow that's pretty revolutionary . Rules state no one should get two more than anyone else, so with Sul passing we move on. Ill write er up now. (I'll put that down as No horses since the Giant Armed Beetles would count as a separate yes)
Reply
08-04-2016, 07:32 AM (This post was last modified: 08-05-2016 05:05 AM by The O Fan.)
Post: #42
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Step 4: First Pass

Group decisions are now over. For the rest of the game, each player makes
decisions individually and has vast power to shape history.
Each player now gets to add more detail to the history, creating either a
new Period or Event. Players can go in any order they want.

* To add a Period, place it between any two adjacent
Periods, then give a short description of what happens
during that time. Say if the Tone is Light or Dark.

* An Event is a specific thing that happens inside a Period,
like a prince seizing the throne or a colony ship arriving
on a new world. To add a new Event, decide what Period
the Event is in. If there are already other Events in that
Period, place it before or after one of them. An Event
must be inside an existing Period. Tell the other players
what happens during the Event. Say if the Tone is Light
or Dark.


Periods show us the big picture, the broad sweep of history,
Events zoom in closer and explore specific incidents within a Period, and
Scenes zoom all the way in and reveal what happens moment-by-moment
within an Event.
When you make a Period or an Event, you have vast power to shape history.
You can add anything you want as part of your description, spontaneously
creating–or destroying–people, places, or things.

A player adds a new Event “the King’s army destroys the
secret stronghold of the Moon Cultists, who are trying
to unite the seven pieces of the sacred sword, Invictus.”
Neither the king, the cult or the sword had been mentioned
before. The current player just made them all up.


No one owns anything in the history. It doesn’t matter who created
something: when it’s your turn you can do anything you want with it. The
only limits to your creativity are:
1. Don’t contradict what’s already been said.
2. Make sure what you add relates to the current Focus.(More on this later)
3. Don’t use anything from the No column of the Palette.
Only the current player gets to contribute. Other players should not give
suggestions or ideas, and the current player cannot ask for input either.
Other players can and should ask for clarification if they can’t visualize what
the current player is describing.

Paint a clear picture. Particularly with Events, the other players should be
able to visualize what physically happens. Other players don’t get input,
but they should ask questions if there’s something they need to know to
understand what you’re creating.

“Tarsus colony is destroyed” is a good starting point for
an Event, but it’s too vague. If we were watching from a
birds-eye view, we would probably see how the colony
was destroyed. Did it blow up? Was it invaded? “A reactor
accident destroys the Tarsus biodome” or “killer machines
demolish the colony” paint a more complete picture.


How much detail should you include? A good rule of thumb is to describe
what would be visible from a birds-eye view at the level of history you’re
creating. If you’re making a Period, your description should include the
broad sweeps of history, but not specific details that would emerge during
an Event or Scene. If you’re making an Event, zoom in closer and describe
what happens, but not the moment-by-moment detail of a Scene.
Remember to declare the outcome. There’s a natural tendency to describe
a starting situation, but not the conclusion. But in Microscope we already
know how it ends. You always see the big picture before you zoom in and
explore the details. Even if we never examine this part of history further, we
should have a clear (but perhaps simplistic) sense of what happened.

“The President runs for re-election” is a bad Event, because
it doesn’t tell us the outcome. Does he win? Does he lose?
The result is something we could easily see, so it should
be part of the description. Without that information, the
description is a cliffhanger, not a summary.



There’s always room between two items in the history. If you have two
Periods, you can always add another Period in the middle, provided you
describe it in a way that doesn’t contradict what’s already known.

Making History: Periods
A Period is the largest subdivision of the history. It is a very large chunk of
time, usually decades or centuries depending on your history, like an era of
feudal wars or stellar colonization.

To make a new Period:

1) Decide when it is: Place the new Period between any two
adjacent Periods–the Period to the left is earlier, the one
to the right is later.

2) Describe the Period: Give the other players a grand
summary of what happens during this time or what
things are like. Describe how it is different from other
Periods around it, as appropriate.

3) Say whether it is Light or Dark: Explain how that Tone
fits your description. You’re never wrong about Tone, but
you do have to justify your choice to the other players.


Your world can change drastically from Period to Period. Kingdoms can rise
and fall, and whole technologies or schools of thought can be discovered
or lost. Be sure to describe how the Period you are making is different from
other Periods around it, as appropriate.

“This is before the colonies build the warp-net, but they
have developed faster star drives, so you can travel between
worlds in a few weeks rather than years. Interstellar
commerce and travel is now commonplace. The New Sun
faith from the ‘Crusades’ Period is everywhere, but it’s
not a fervent belief anymore, just customs and traditions
everyone shares without thinking about it.”


Your description can include how the new Period relates to the Periods
around it. But even if you visualize your Period as coming right before or
after another Period, someone else could add a Period in between them
later on, so long as their description of their Period doesn’t contradict what
was already said.

There’s already a “the gods curse the world with endless
winter” Period, and you make a new Period right before it:
“A golden age of prosperity, the calm before the accursed
winter.” You visualize the golden age leading right up to
the winter Period, but later another player adds a Period
between them where the clans become proud and turn
away from the sacred rituals, angering the gods. You
didn’t expect it, but it doesn’t violate anything in the
description of either Period, so it’s okay.



Note that you don’t specify exactly how long a Period is. Your description
may include a broad sense of how much time is passing (“it’s a war that
rages for generations” or “this is decades after the revolution”), but we never
count years or worry about exactly how long something is.

EXAMPLE: MAKING A PERIOD
On a player’s turn, she says: “I’m making a new Period
after the ‘Peace of Ulrix’ and before the ‘Coming of the
Western Kings.’ It’s a time of great terror, with evil wraithspirits
possessing and corrupting the lords of the realms,
from the king on down. There’s oppression and terrible
deeds, and the people live in terror of their once-noble
lords. The gleaming courts of chivalry become places of
nightmare. And yes, it’s Dark.”
Another player asks for clarification about how that
relates to something from earlier in the game: “Does
that include the descendents of High King Ulrix? I assume
they’d have the power to resist that kind of thing.” The
player making the Period won’t say because she thinks
that much detail wouldn’t be visible at the Period level.
To find out, someone will have to zoom in and make an
Event in this Period.
After she’s finished speaking her turn is over.
Reply
08-04-2016, 07:39 AM (This post was last modified: 08-05-2016 05:05 AM by The O Fan.)
Post: #43
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Making History: Events

An Event is something specific that happens during a Period, like a great
battle or a festival. While a Period encompasses everything that happens
across a large span of time, an Event describes what happens at a particular
time and place. Just like Periods, the literal length of an Event is not
important. Some Events may seem long, others very short.

To make a new Event:

1) Decide when it is: Place the Event in an existing Period.
You cannot have an Event outside a Period. If there are
already other Events in that Period, place it before or
after one of them chronologically.

2) Describe the Event: Tell the other players what happens.
Your description should be specific enough that the
other players have a clear picture of what physically
takes place. Make sure to include the outcome, not just
the start.

3) Say whether it is Light or Dark: Explain how that Tone
fits your description. You’re never wrong about Tone, but
you do have to justify your choice to the other players.


As play continues, each Event could wind up with multiple Scenes inside it,
each one showing us more detail about what happened during that Event.
If you start to make an Event that describes something that is part of an
existing Event, make a Scene inside of that Event instead. Anything that
builds up to or describes the aftermath of what was described in an Event
(like a meeting planning an upcoming attack, or the survivors escaping
after that attack) is probably a Scene in that Event, not a separate Event.
Avoiding split Events helps keeps your history manageable and easier to
grasp: instead of having several Event cards that really just describe one
thing, you’ll have a single Event card summarizing the core concept, with
all the related Scene cards tucked neatly beneath it.
There’s already an Event, “The Owl guns down mob boss
Segretti at his trial.” A player wants to make an Event
where the vigilante hero gets caught by police for the
shooting, but the other players point out that if it happens
soon after, not years later, it’s really a Scene inside that
same Event.


EXAMPLE: MAKING AN EVENT
On the next player’s turn, he says “I’ll make an Event in
this ‘Lords of Shadow’ Period. A warrior-prince who’s
a direct descendent of High King Ulrix sneaks into the
castle of a shadow-tainted Duke to rescue his sister, who
the Duke has captured and plans to wed. The prince and
princess had both been in hiding, and they had escaped
corruption. The Event is totally Dark.”

He has described a situation, but not the outcome, so
another player asks him to declare the visible outcome.
His turn is done.


Later on, a different player decides to spend her turn
exploring some of what led up to the princess’s abduction.
She says “I’m interested in this Duke who abducted the
princess. I don’t think he was always such a bad guy.”

“I’m making an Event earlier in the Period, before this Duke
was tainted by the wraith-spirits. He’s much younger, and
he’s not the Duke yet. His father still rules. He’s just a young
noble knight. We didn’t name him before, but I’m going to
give one now. Let’s call him Colliard.”

“The Event is that the same princess from the other Event
is sent to the Duke’s domain for the summer to keep her
safe from some potential danger at the court, and the Duke makes his son her guardian and knight-protector.
She’s only a girl back then, but despite their age difference
Colliard and the princess become fast friends. She even
has a childish crush on her protector. It’s Light, a pleasant
summer of youth.”
Another player asks “So wait, years earlier she’s a welcome
guest in the same castle she gets abducted to later on? By
her childhood friend / guardian?”
“Yep, that’s right.”
“Dude. I can’t decide if that’s better or worse…”
Reply
08-04-2016, 07:40 AM
Post: #44
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
You Build on Each Other…
When you describe a Period, Event or the setup for a Scene, sell
it. Pitch your vision to the other players. Paint a picture in vivid
colors. Breathe life into it. Other players can’t veto, but if they
aren’t interested or don’t understand your idea, they won’t build
on it. In traditional game terms, for the moment you are the
GM, making the other players believe in your world. Speak with
authority, like you’re describing a real thing you can see.
Microscope is all about building on each other’s ideas. Every
player has immense creative power and can invent whole chunks
of history all by themselves, but they’re also dependent on each
other. Even if you’re the Lens, you can’t create a Scene along
with an Event and Period to contain it all in one swoop. More
likely you’ll build an Event in a Period someone else made, or a
Scene in someone else’s Event. To make what you want, you have
to listen to what other people have made and think of how to
expand on it.
Sometimes it works the other way: you’ll create something you
think is dull or obvious, but it inspires another player to build on
it in a way you didn’t foresee. Your “boring” idea can snowball
into something unexpected and wonderful. So don’t be afraid
to create something simple: you may be providing a valuable
foundation for someone else.

… But Don’t Collaborate
Nothing will kill your game faster than playing by committee.
When it’s someone else’s turn, don’t coach. Explaining the rules is
fine, but don’t suggest ideas. Even if another player wants ideas,
don’t give them. Let them come up with something.
Be interested in what other players create. Ask questions,
demand clarification. If there are contradictions, point them out,
but resist the urge to make suggestions, even tiny ones. You’ve
already inspired them with your contributions to the history.
Now wait and see what they do with it. Keep your poker face.
If you collaborate and discuss ideas as a group, you’ll get a very
smooth and very boring history. But if you wait and let people
come up with their own ideas, they may take the history in
surprising and fascinating directions. It can be hard to sit silently
and watch someone think, but the results can be awesome. You’ll
get a chance to interact more fluidly when you role-play Scenes.

Nuking Atlantis
Or “Can I just say that guy is dead?”
It doesn’t matter who created that gleaming city on the hill or
who played that character in the last Scene: if it’s your turn,
you can do whatever you want. No one owns anything in the
history. You can make an Event and say “this is when the Prophet
gets assassinated” or “this is when that awesome city you guys
have been going on about gets nuked. Boom!” You have nigh
unlimited power, so long as you don’t contradict what’s already
been established.
Don’t pull your punches. Killing a character or nuking a city
doesn’t remove it from the game because you can always go
back in time and explore what it was like when it was still around.
No matter what you do, other players can still go back and use
it, so don’t be afraid to wipe things out. Nothing is ever removed
from the history. The past is never closed.
Reply
08-04-2016, 07:42 AM
Post: #45
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
That covers events and periods, that's a massive info dump so we dont need to complicate things for our first pass.

Right now the four of us in any order will add a Period or an Event within a period.

Remember we only have two Periods open
Start Period (dark): A Nation under tense times is on the cusp of being ravaged by a Civil War centered on powerful and noble warriors.


End Period (Dark): The last of the Wandering Warriors dies out as The Nation embraces it's new status as a global empire.

So if you want to do an event not in any of those you have to make its period first (and only one each this round).
Reply
08-04-2016, 08:00 AM (This post was last modified: 08-04-2016 11:22 PM by The O Fan.)
Post: #46
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Period: A Nation under tense times is on the cusp of being ravaged by a Civil War centered on powerful and noble warriors.(Dark)

Event: The Bending of the Baran(Dark)

Tensions between the Gunbaran and the Government finally boil over. After the Tyler Acquisition(両平良), there is much debate on how to deal with the land. While the increasingly powerful Rika party wishes to have in settled and colonized to fulfill there Mandated Destiny and curb overpopulation on the coast the Gunbaran who fought for the land which to see it broken up into further Teiits for them to build Plantations on.

In the wake of the Rika(理科) party gaining control of the Senaat(先名後), all Gunbaran(軍散ん) are called to the Capital of Senat(先名都) and given a choice. Either give up the lands of their Teiits (帝一つ) , pledge allegiance to the government , Marsshal(丸為る) for the Senaat and be granted armies in exchange or refuse the call and have their lands and Ammo(安名) taken.

Those that took the deal were given their first order, hunt down and bring to heel those who didn't, those known as the Auts Law(合うつ ら) who had raised a mighty insurrection against the Senaat. So began the War of the States(戦軍帝一つ) Period.

Glossary:

Gunbaran(軍散ん):Gun Baron/(un)Distributed Army
A class of noble warriors, each masters of combat and warfare. Originally each Gunbaran was given a grant of land and noble title as compensation for fighting for the Senaaat. With more land on the table and a Senaat looking to expand settlement this system is being challenged.

Rika(理科): Measure and Order
A political philosophy that has gained prominence that believes it is the Mandated Destiny of the people to colonize and settle the whole of the nation, taming the wilds in the name of ordered civilization

Senaat(先名後): Senate/Original Named Remnants
The nominal supreme government of the nation, made up of the descents of the original settlers , each bearing an "Original Name" as a noble title.

Senat(先名都): Senate/Original Named Remnants
The term used when describing the Senate as a location as oppose to a people. A sprawling mass of villages, farms, and increasingly larger urban conglomerates and industrial centers that occupies the most of the coast. The major geographic region of the nation along with the Teiits of the frontier

Teiits(帝一つ): States/Empires of One
Land grants based in the frontier where one Gunbaran holds nominal supremacy. Formed to stave off conflict between Gunbaran and eventually grew into vehicles for massive and under settled Plantation systems.

Marsshal(丸為る): Marshal/to Circle
An action taken by a Gunbaran as mandated by the Senaat to continuously move through a Teiits as opposed to staying settled in a plantation. This is to enforce the law of the Senaat and to protect future settlers.(And also to avoid the then current practice of centralizing Gunbaran power in a single Plantation , forming the potential for rival capitals, fortresses or castles while leaving most land in the Teiits uncontrolled)

Ammo(安名): Ammo/Safety Name vul. Cheap Name
The greatest weapon of a Gunbaran; this is a noble title bestowed on a warrior and there descendants in exchange for service to the Senaat. It comes with ti the right to own land. Because this title can be earned and not only inherited (ass opposed to the Original Names of the Senaat) it is insulting referred to as a "Cheap Name"

Auts Law(合うつ ら): Outs Law/One Suits
So named because of a life of perceived poverty and drifting this is what the Gunbaran for refused the Senaat and had there lands and Ammo taken came to be called.

The Tyler Acquisition (両平良): Tyler/ The Two Good Plains
A great mass of land recently gained in a war initiated by the great Senaator Tyler, this territory became the lynch pin of the War of the States Period because of the question whether to settle it in the name of Rika or to break it up to make Teeits for the Gunbaran who fought to claim it.


All the original terms I made here work as both English and Japanese riffs, based on etymological drifts and shifts in both languages. (That took a LOAD of research) All the meanings have in story detail and explanation behind them, but that background has to remain headcanon until I get a chance to RP it into the game. But I think the substance of the event and everyone role in it its clear enough from context, if not ask questions away

To clarify what's next any other player must now write up an Event like I did in one of our two periods OR make a new period between the two we have. Any events in the same period have to be before or after eachother so if you make an event in the starting period you have to say if its before or after the one I just made (you dont need to give any details timeline wise beyond that). And remember they all stack so if Sul for example makes a new period, Vancho can add an event to it.

After everyone has a go we can start the game proper
Reply
08-04-2016, 08:28 AM (This post was last modified: 08-04-2016 08:29 AM by Mister Visceral.)
Post: #47
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Period: A Nation under tense times is on the cusp of being ravaged by a Civil War centered on powerful and noble warriors.(Dark)

Event: The Slaughter of the Haijones (Dark)

The Haijone family were nobles before the Rika gained control of the Senaat, having established their family fortune working as mercenaries. When the Gunbaran were called to the Senate, the Haijones did not show up, refusing to align themselves with either the Marsshals or the Auts Laws.

Neither party was pleased with the Haijones' neutrality, but the Freicho family was the first to take action. Cooperating with fellow Marsshals in the Raison family, the Freichos mounted an ambush on the Haijones' family, ending in arson. Only two members of the Haijone family made it out alive: preadolescents Bailee (boy) and Rou (girl).

((In case it wasn't clear, this takes place after The Bending of the Baran))

"We love eloquence for its own sake, and not for any truth which it may utter, or any heroism it may inspire."
-Henry David Thoreau
Reply
08-04-2016, 10:38 AM (This post was last modified: 08-04-2016 11:02 AM by The O Fan.)
Post: #48
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Great Work! See Spoilers for fanfic theatre!


In Micro scope nothing is Canon unless done in a scene, event or period and collaboration is killer. That doesn't mean I can't do the occasional inconsequential wank. That includes me translating all the names and concepts into the appropriate dog japanese/dog English. In this case the noble families.





佩予熱(Haijones, BurningBlades)

不例 劫(Freichos,Disastrous Affliction )

雷尊(Raison, Noble Thunder)


Like I said, everything here is apocryphal unless put in the actual rp, so its just me having fun . Enjoy!

Can't wait to see Vancho and Sup work some magic! Also it's funny how you indepentantly came up with the same concept I did. Can't tell you which one it was though. ;)


I'll update these into a timeline post once our starting round ends.
Reply
08-04-2016, 10:56 AM
Post: #49
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
Can I get a clarification on what's going on in Fan's post? A lot of it is made up terms and it might just be me being dense but I can't really decipher what's going on in that event.
Reply
08-04-2016, 11:01 AM
Post: #50
RE: Microscope: Fractal Worldbuilding
I think he is saying that the political Rika party were elected and gained control of the senate, and then ordered all gunbearers to report to the capital (also called Senat for extra confusion), and were then offered a choice between three options.
Reply


Forum Jump: