Iron States: Spring's promise
06-24-2013, 02:31 AM (This post was last modified: 06-24-2013 03:53 AM by Galloglasses.)
Post: #1
Iron States: Spring's promise
[Image: 1IRON%20STATES.png]
[Image: minimap1.png]
(Click Minimap for full)


The world has been sleeping in the long winter of darkness and is finally awakening to a new era of mankind.

The family, long the locus of myth and legend shall recount tales of these times, its heroes and its villains. Its triumphs and its tragedies.

The truth of these times are long shrouded in what is now more legend then fact and none can be sure of reliability of the oral and written traditions.

But these are the tales of the nations that birthed the world in which we now live.

This is the tale of the spring of mankind.

----

Welcome to Iron states, a back-to-basics city states game sticking as close as possible to the initial formula that made the states game such a rich and satisfying experience. Not that the other experiments in states games have been total disasters (yes they have) but I suppose we experimented too far from the essentials before we perfected them.

As such this states game has no fantasy elements and no particular theme other then it being set in the Early Iron Ages. (EARLY, Iron ages, mind.) There have been no previous empires in this world, in fact the concept of empire hasn't even been developed yet.

As such the player starts off as a tribe of humans in a city/camp/hidey hole/whatever your civilization happens to call home with no extensive lands to call their own. How old can your civilization be? I don't care, but it sure as hell didn't venture too far beyond its walls. As a result, the world is still covered fairly extensively by forests which dominate the land, extensive farming is unheard of. The up sides of this? Plagues are less common and less devastating (unless you are very city focused, then it becomes a problem.) Down side? You don't have extensive farms and there's fucking trees everywhere.

Players start off in the general area I have laid out in the minimap. This is close enough for the players civilizations to be roughly aware of eachother, yet far enough that you won't immediately clonk eachother over the heads at gamestart, (or you will, I don't care.) With more then enough for your guys to explore.

So in short:
-Era: Very early Iron Ages
-Mohs Scale of SciFi Hardness: Not Fantasy
Player limit: 8 before game can be started, but willing to allow 10
-There will be no player characters
-There will be no late entries. Not even if a player drops out.
-If you are unlikely to continue this game a month down the line or so, please do not bother signing up, I may end up picking you and end up with one less place for a long term player.

Also players will be asked to name nearby mountains and rivers and such for flavour.

Now, on to the apps.

Application
Player Name:
Civilization/Tribe Name:
Ruler/s Name:
Banner/flag:
What is your tribe generally known for:
Biography:
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06-24-2013, 03:48 AM (This post was last modified: 06-29-2013 08:23 AM by Supernerd.)
Post: #2
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Player Name: Supernerd
Civilization/Tribe Name: The Da'arwiinists
Ruler/s Name: Crucius Gallant
Banner/flag: [Image: 7D7Qabx.png]
What is your tribe generally known for: Citizens with physical prowess, below average education, a tendency to eat raw meat and short life expectancy.
Biography:
The Da'arwiinists are a nomadic people who are strongly connected with nature. The tribe consists of many small groups of betwen 10 and 100 people or so who all more or less share the same ideals. They never stray too far from the river as it is their primary method of obtaining water and fishing is a considerable source of food, and because of this they would frequently encounter other people from their tribe.

The Da'arwiinists are named as such for their religious beliefs. They believe in a god they call Da'arwiin who favors the strong, and as such ones own physical strength and athletic prowess is the primary representation how well one is respected within the tribe and people would frequently hunt large beasts to prove their strength. Food is quite plentiful amongst the tribe, partly because the Da'arwiinists have yet to learn about cooking food with a fire and are willing to eat things that other humans wouldn't, and as a result of this the tribe had developed a tolerance to disease over the centuries. Certain concepts such as sanitation, monogamy and dying of old age are completely unheard of within the tribe. People frequently die of disease and unsuccessful hunts often before they even reach adulthood and as such birth rates are also very high. Its not unheard of or even rare for a mother to bear over ten children in her lifetime. As opposed to being primarily the parents duty, taking care of children is typically done by the tribe as a whole.

The Da'arwiinists hold to their traditions very strongly, and as such they seldom make any new discoveries. Some of the things that they have accomplished however, is the construction of tools and traps with wood and stone, clothing made using plant fibre and tree bark used more for protection than modesty, and how to make a surprisingly sturdy bridge. As they stay near the river the Da'arwiinists have made quite a few bridges. They have also carved totem poles which are placed strategically to indicate which seasons fish are usually present in certain parts of the river and around places where large beasts tend to lurk. There are also a few crude shrines to Da'arwiin where it is customary to sacrifice the weaker animals that are hunted when food is plentiful.

The chieftain of the Da'arwiinists is simply whoever is the most adept hunter. The chief does not hold very much real authority within the tribe and is primarily a symbolic title. Who the chieftain of the Da'arwiinists is tends to change rather frequently.
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06-24-2013, 06:46 AM (This post was last modified: 06-24-2013 07:17 AM by Vancho1.)
Post: #3
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Player Name: Vancho1
Civilization/Tribe Name: Numis
Ruler/s Name: Ashkantheis
Banner/flag:
Big SVG in spoiler, as is my tradition:
[Image: Numis%20Tribal%20Flag.svg]
[Image: Numis%20Tribal%20Flag.png]
What is your tribe generally known for: Snake-taming, animal-based religion, hallucinatory drugs in religious practices.
Biography:

The smoke rose slowly from the hill. A great fire burned, and around it the Numis people chanted and danced. They prayed to the mighty Bear, to the swift Eagle, but most importantly to the cunning Snake. Near the sacred fire sat Ashkantheis, High Priest and Chief of the Numis. Or rather, his body did. His mind was far away, in the realm of the Spirits, sent by the ritual reenactment of his ancestor's quest to gain the wisdom of the Spirit Gods which ruled this land. He had inhaled deeply of the sacred incense, drank the ritual potion, and danced the dances until he was in a deep trance, separated from his body. The Numis were prepared to give anything to the Gods to ensure the safe return of their leader, but for now they chanted and prayed and waited for him to awaken.

Ashkantheis's eyes stirred. The chanting reached a fever-pitch, and two snakes coiled around his arms. The fire burned ever hotter. The drumbeats reached a crescendo. The Numis swayed, dancing faster and faster around their leader.

Ashkantheis stood, and with a wave of his hand, everything stopped. Even the fire seemed to shrink in his presence. Only his two snakes moved, moving up his arms before settling again. With a thunderous voice, approaching that of the gods themselves, Ashkantheis spoke.

"My people, heed my words, and heed them well. The time for our rise is at hand. The Gods have told me this, and they have told me more. Long have the Numis hidden from the world, venturing out only to gather food and fuel for fire. We feared the dark unknown, knowing that it was not the same as the comforting darkness of our homes in the earth. Long have we relied on the protection of the Gods to keep our people safe, to nurture us and protect the Numis from the unknown. The great Snake told me that it is time for us to expand, to meet other peoples, and to bring the land under our dominion. No longer shall we fear the unknown lands. No longer shall the Numis hide! For today starts a new age, a new era for our people! Go forward, Numis! Go forth without fear! The Spirits of the land are behind us!"

The one, the only, Vancho!
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06-24-2013, 06:56 AM
Post: #4
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Note: the winter/spring motifs are metaphors, not literal. your people havent been enduring a song of ice and fire seasonal change.
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06-24-2013, 07:14 AM
Post: #5
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Metaphor. Right. Small changes will be made.

The one, the only, Vancho!
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06-24-2013, 07:26 AM (This post was last modified: 07-01-2013 04:01 AM by Bramzter.)
Post: #6
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Player Name: Bramzter

Civilization/Tribe Name: Da' BluddSkull Barbarians

Ruler/s Name: Warboss Dragskum "Da SkullSplitta"

Banner/flag:
[Image: Orkyflagz_zps708b5776.png]

What is your tribe generally known for: Looting, Fighting and Weaponry
Biography:

-From the journal of Urist Meckbahl. Adventurer in training.

The Azure mountains were once filled with life and civilization, A few idyllic villages lived of the land and amassed great prestige and prosperity...Well until now of course

There is a /reason/ travelers are advised stay away from the mountains, Nomadic monsters of men came from unknown parts bearing weapons and torches. They drove out any who survived, Their villages gone, Their houses burned, their people... slaughtered.

In their place came these /people/. I can see their bonfire's across the mountain tops, They have small camps everywhere with the most gruesome.. decorations. I have forgotten how many skulls i have passed but i can tell you they are /far/ to many.. These brute's salvage anything they can get their ugly hands on, and they can't even speak properly. that bloody accent is horrifying.

They really like fighting tho... Saw some makeshift arena's on my way here, they also like being loud, i can hear the sounds of drums in the deep even here..

They know these mountains, all paths and hidden ways. If i can get close perhaps i can find out more of their plans, I wouldn't want those.. those things coming down form their perch to burn /my/ home. I think i found a way in. its between their patrols so i-


The rest of the tablet is slathered in crimson, there's a sloppy message carved on the bottom.

Heh! Da'z panzee haz 'n nice skull for ma pointt stick!
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06-24-2013, 07:59 AM (This post was last modified: 06-24-2013 08:06 AM by Demonsul.)
Post: #7
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Player Name: Demonsul

Civilization Name: Tharia (aka the Tharian Theocracy)

Ruler Name: XXIV, Sanis, of Divine Appointment, Ruler of Tharia, High Interpreter of the Godly Wills and Protector of the Faithful

Banner:
[Image: flag_prototype_lannister.png]

What is your tribe generally known for: Being highly religious people. Their polytheistic pantheon, known as Thidesia, allows for the six major and countless minor gods. Aside from that they are a pretty well-rounded iron age city-state.

Biography: The city of Tharia was founded in the depths of ancient myth by the Second Prophet of Thidesia, Hannin the Founder. She began the city by building the tomb of the Nameless, the First Prophet, upon the cliff where a small stream flowed off the edge into the sea. It was a crude stone mausoleum, and around it spread wooden houses. The city grew over a decade, insular but gradually expanding through simple population growth.

After the Third Prophet, Tallus the Just, formalized the position of rulership over the holy city, there were twenty four rulers of 'divine appointment'. Effectively, the rulers choose their successor from amongst any follower of the Thidesian faith. The position is for life, and as such the ruler must have a successor nominated from their first day of leadership.

It is not unknown for a ruler to personally train their son or daughter to succeed them, although it is equally common for particularly pious priests to be awarded the right to succeed the leader. The appointment is considered divine as the leader is supposed to be the highest interpreter of the wills of the gods, as well as the defender and guide for the entire city and the faith as a whole.

The city is situated near a prominent bluff overlooking the sea, where a very small stream once ran over the edge of the cliff. The stream dried up shortly after the city's founding and the bulk of the city developed further along the coast, where clean water was more easily acquired and the coast was smooth rather than a cliff. The only structure still standing atop the promontory now is the ancient stone tomb of the First Prophet, still a very holy site.

The city itself has dried-brick walls, with most of the structures being constructed of wood or dried-brick. An exception is the grand temple complex, constructed of stone bricks and flagstones, which contains the six open-air temples to the gods as well as numerous shrines. It is naturally the center of the city, and the modest palace of the ruler overlooks it.

The current ruler is the twenty-fourth since Tallus the Just's reforms. He is named Sanis - were he a common nobleman, he would be Sanis Sandaros Hillas. It is customary for leaders to be referred to by only their personal name and their numeral. He inherited the position from his father, and is training his daughter to succeed him when he dies. His father earned the position for being an important and successful organizer of holy festivals.

XXIV Sanis is widely regarded as a just, but somewhat wroth ruler. He only succeeded the position a couple of years ago, and has just completed cementing his rule. His vision has now turned outwards, a direction rarely looked to by previous rulers, but perhaps it is time for the faith - and the realm - to expand...
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06-24-2013, 09:02 AM (This post was last modified: 06-25-2013 02:21 PM by Cetus Amicus.)
Post: #8
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Player Name: Cetus Amicus
Civilization/Tribe Name: Morkoth
Ruler/s Name: King Crooglut, Hierarch Ruckjop
Banner/flag:
[Image: nDTviuX.png]
What is your tribe generally known for: Sailing, Fishing, Pottery
Biography: A relatively young tribe, the Morkoth people lived on the coast for generations before suddenly and mysteriously departing onto the seas and settling a series of islands. The exact reason for this move is not known, but scholars speculate they may have wanted to be closer to their preferred diet - seafood. Other, less reputable, sources believe the Morkoth people intend to become one with their oceanic deities and turn into fish-man hybrids that will one day take over the surface world, however these theories are dismissed as the inane ravings of madmen. Especially considering that the oceanic deity worship only truly blossomed on the islands.

The early Morkoth civilization was centered around a temple complex dedicated to Veckun and his many vassals. The temples themselves were the most elaborate and distinctive symbols of the Morkoth people, containing many large pools of decorative fish and elaborate murals recounting legends of the Ocean Kings exploits. Water is, of course, used extensively in Morkoth architecture. The Palace of the Ocean King is the highest, most central structure and overlooks the entire city.

The first ruler, King Crooglut, came to power after the journey across the sea and was personally anointed by Hierarch Ruckjop, who is believed to have led the expedition in the first place. Their chief deity is Veckun, master of the oceans, watcher of the seas, and is often depicted as riding a mythical creature with the body of an oyster and the legs of a crab.

The King of the Morkoth is held to be the mortal emissary to the gods themselves and inherits the title of Ocean King from Veckun himself, though to his divine superiors he is known as the Ocean Emissary. The concept of government separate from clergy is rather novel to these people, as priests and elders (the difference has not been entirely deciphered by historians) have solely led the Morkoth for at least a century.

In the Morkoth culture jealousy is considered the greatest sin a being can commit, higher than even betrayal, and as such a man who turns traitor for his benefit will be judged far more severely than one who did to protect his family or uphold his principles. Pearls, being very rare in those times became a prominent status symbol, but also a symbol for jealousy. The common depiction of Veckun as a "pearl in the oyster" has established the belief that the gods' bounty should be shared by all peoples and not hoarded by the rich and powerful. As such, Morkoth temples are public places used for a variety of purposes including prayer, tribute, celebration, and official business.

King Crooglut has spent his reign glorifying his city and focusing on domestic issues, but recently he has turned has gaze upon old shores and nearby islands. With their futures turned outwards, the clergy are preparing to announce the dawn of a new age for the Morkoth people.
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06-24-2013, 10:25 AM
Post: #9
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Gallo, if you don't mind me asking, why did BAMN end so quickly?

The one, the only, Vancho!
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06-24-2013, 10:39 AM
Post: #10
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
(06-24-2013 10:25 AM)Vancho1 Wrote:  Gallo, if you don't mind me asking, why did BAMN end so quickly?

Horrendous depression, burnout and bad planning.
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06-24-2013, 11:16 AM (This post was last modified: 06-27-2013 01:15 PM by Palamedes.)
Post: #11
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Player Name: Palamedes
Civilization/Tribe Name: Laurent
Ruler/s Name: Halidon of the Water
Banner/flag:
[Image: ISFlag.png]
What is your tribe generally known for: Archery, Smithing, Forestry
Biography: The area that is now Laurent used to be the lands of three separate tribes. The first, that of Lar the warlord, was highly militaristic, constantly raiding the other two people of the area - the Entil and Urege tribes. While the Entil were famous in the region for their woodsmen and carpenters and had managed to build up a rough palisade wall to force back all but the most dedicated attacks of their aggressors, the Urege were not so lucky, and despite a rudimentary alliance between them and the Entil were constantly under attack from Lar's tribe.

One day, not so long ago, a man by the name of Halidon appeared with his sisters and brothers. They claimed to come from beyond the water, which is where Halidon received his moniker. The family moved into the Urege tribe and quickly taught them the ways of their land. Soon, the Urege were armed with bronze and iron instead of the wooden clubs and spears they were used to. Using these new weapons, they managed to fight off the first Lar raiding party in years, and quickly swore to follow the newcomers. Unfortunately, Lar was infuriated and began massing his tribe to destroy the tribe and the foreigners who had opposed him.

Halidon next took his family along with his newly gained people and fled to the Entil tribe. The Entil were initially infuriated that their part-time allies were bringing the Lar horde to their doorsteps, but were soon swayed by both Halidon's technological prowess as well as the potential ability to finally stand up to and defeat the Lar. Within the days before the attack, the two united tribes had expanded upon the Entil palisade to improve its integrity and include several wooden towers, and the foreigners had shown them how to better craft the bows they had used to hold back the Lar before.

As expected, the tribe of Lar arrived and began to storm the palisade. Normally, they were used to the Entil only putting up token resistance, and were surprised by the retaliation of the two tribes. Though the palisade was eventually breached, Lar himself was slain late in the attack, and in the confusion the Lar tribe fractured, with many fleeing or splintering into factions and killing each other. The rest, which composed of the majority of the tribe who didn't participate and a good portion of those who did and surrendered swore themselves to the strength of the foreigner from across the water. The Entil, upon seeing their former allies and friends united and losing many of their own leaders in the struggle, also joined the new burgeoning country.

With the three tribes united under him, Halidon rapidly expanded into the lands around him, subjugating the tribes in the area through blood and diplomacy. Quickly, he became the ruler of a large and strong, if somewhat disjointed and progressing nation.
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06-24-2013, 04:33 PM
Post: #12
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
With the three tribes united under him, Halidon rapidly expanded into the lands around him, subjugating the tribes in the area through blood and diplomacy. Quickly, he became the ruler of a large and strong, if somewhat disjointed and progressing nation.

No you didn't. People start off quite small at gamestart.
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06-24-2013, 04:50 PM
Post: #13
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
I meant more like.

Comparatively large. As in, more per my small shitty piece of land then the average number per small shitty piece of land.
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06-24-2013, 09:02 PM
Post: #14
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
I believe we are starting with a single settlement, however.
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06-25-2013, 03:37 AM (This post was last modified: 07-05-2013 10:16 AM by Lightning Scorpion.)
Post: #15
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Reserved.

Actually, nevermind.
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06-25-2013, 08:04 AM
Post: #16
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
What are the chances that my application will be overlooked due to a minimalistic biography?
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06-25-2013, 08:15 AM
Post: #17
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Depends on how many people sign up with ample biographies, I'd wager.

Also Sul I assume we start with at least the area immediately around our settlements under at least our nominal as well (you know, hunting grounds/farmlands/fishing spots/etc.)
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06-25-2013, 08:20 AM
Post: #18
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
(06-25-2013 08:15 AM)Palamedes Wrote:  Depends on how many people sign up with ample biographies, I'd wager.

Also Sul I assume we start with at least the area immediately around our settlements under at least our nominal as well (you know, hunting grounds/farmlands/fishing spots/etc.)

Well I'd assume so, but you never know with Gallo. :P
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06-25-2013, 08:54 AM (This post was last modified: 06-25-2013 08:55 AM by Galloglasses.)
Post: #19
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Your tribe's hunting grounds are defined by how far fromt he settlement they can get before being hunted themselves.

Sleep tight.

(06-25-2013 08:04 AM)Supernerd Wrote:  What are the chances that my application will be overlooked due to a minimalistic biography?

Very very high.
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06-25-2013, 09:14 AM (This post was last modified: 06-25-2013 09:20 AM by Supernerd.)
Post: #20
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
I don't want to bother making an extensive history for a mere chance to play a game. But I'll do it if this game is going to update very frequently. Is this game going to update very frequently?
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06-25-2013, 09:40 AM
Post: #21
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
(06-25-2013 09:14 AM)Supernerd Wrote:  I don't want to bother making an extensive history for a mere chance to play a game. But I'll do it if this game is going to update very frequently. Is this game going to update very frequently?

You know, if you're asking that sort of question, you clearly aren't invested enough in the idea of a states game and probably shouldn't put the bother in an extended app at all. These games are long term products with high investment costs.
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06-25-2013, 10:18 AM
Post: #22
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
I merely don't want to put a serious effort into my application only to get rejected, it has happened in the past and I would prefer to not subject myself to that again in the immediate future. The precise definition of a "States Game" is not obvious, and while I have seen games that would qualify as one in the old forums I wouldn't assume that this game is anything like them just because it is described as a states game. Aside from the fact that we would be playing as a small civilization in the early iron ages you have provided little information about the actual game mechanics. I hardly think its fair to assume that I am not willing to invest a substantial amount of effort into this game because I am asking questions.
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06-25-2013, 10:39 AM (This post was last modified: 06-25-2013 10:42 AM by Galloglasses.)
Post: #23
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
(06-25-2013 10:18 AM)Supernerd Wrote:  I merely don't want to put a serious effort into my application only to get rejected, it has happened in the past and I would prefer to not subject myself to that again in the immediate future. The precise definition of a "States Game" is not obvious, and while I have seen games that would qualify as one in the old forums I wouldn't assume that this game is anything like them just because it is described as a states game. Aside from the fact that we would be playing as a small civilization in the early iron ages you have provided little information about the actual game mechanics. I hardly think its fair to assume that I am not willing to invest a substantial amount of effort into this game because I am asking questions.

The game mechanics are as simple as any state's game has been. Due to the era and lack of fantasy elements the technology is simple, (if admittedly vague for the sake of allowing me to rule on tech advancements case by case to avoid players justifying having New Kingdom era Egyptian tech levels while everyone else is the Etruscans) and players only need to focus on whatever actions they are taking and their own issues and webs of intrigue.

In fact with the forbidding of new players and ban on player characters, the mechanics are doubly simple now that the players dont need to worry about some asshole popping into the game late and taking advantage of not having to slog through the same mess everyone else had (Admittedly this is what I did in CS1, and it was kind of bullshit to the other players even if I did have to fight every single one of my neighbours) Or an independent agent setting the palace on fire.

Furthermore its turn based, with the turns likely being years/seasons and done via PMs between GM and players as has always been done in states games.

Theres where the mechanics end for the player side of things, the real heavy lifting, the back game, is invisible to the players and handled by the GM as has always been the case, I only report things to you about it if a decision you or someone else has made has had noticeably serious effects on, oh lets say, your economy.

I fail to see how these aspects have not been in every single states game to date to one extent or another and were not obvious. Hell, they're even in crown which is the least states-like of the states game genre, (unless you count new horizons, which I do not). But there you have it.

I understand the fear of rejection and the ire of something you worked upon not making the cut, I do. But your current app is only going to GUARANTEE rejection. How could it not?
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06-25-2013, 11:10 AM
Post: #24
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Prior to the creation of my application there has been no mention of any minimum amount of information that is required, and as I said before I did not make any assumptions about the exact nature of this game that were not outright stated in the origional post and there have been plenty of games that had even smaller applications. Currently I am under the impression that the only problem with my application is a lack of information in the biography section, but I am not going to assume that. Perhaps my flag isn't realistic enough? Is "The River Tribe" an unacceptable name? All I know is that as it stands now it will not be accepted. That being said, I would appreciate it if you would explain precisely what the problem is so that I may edit it in such a way that it would be deemed acceptable.
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06-25-2013, 11:15 AM
Post: #25
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
I presume it's the bio because yours is only a sentence while other's have more descriptive bios and talks more about the history.
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06-25-2013, 11:37 AM
Post: #26
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Also Supernerd, being passive-aggressive to the GM is probably not such a wise move if you're trying to get into his game.
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06-25-2013, 11:54 AM
Post: #27
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
While I will admit to being more sarcastic than need be, I still believe that the points I am making are valid enough to merit consideration. And a lot of information about this game has been revealed as a result of my questions which I believe was not as obvious as the GM appeared to assume it was. Maybe "How could it not?" was intended to be a rhetorical question, but its also possible that Galloglasses genuinely was curious as to how I could think otherwise so that he might better clarify how his game works.
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06-25-2013, 12:06 PM
Post: #28
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
I will say that someone who is less familiar with states games probably wouldn't know that much about what they're getting into.
Then again, this does seem like a game for veterans as opposed to beginners. What with talk of going "Back to basics" and what not.
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06-25-2013, 12:10 PM (This post was last modified: 06-25-2013 12:11 PM by Demonsul.)
Post: #29
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
The thing with States games is that it's always freeform on the commands end. Players are free to direct their countries however they please. There's not a single gamey mechanic they have to look out for themselves, except in the event of a war in which case Gallo will probably trot out the ol' armies tutorial all over again. I wouldn't call it an exclusive veterans game, but it is definitely playing off the past successes of States games to drum up interest. (Hell, it being 'back to basics' probably makes it more easy for beginners to jump into than anything. It's definitely a game you learn as you go.)
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06-25-2013, 01:23 PM
Post: #30
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
I believe that the key to the application phase is to impress. True, some players will have an advantage due to familiarity or the like, but if you can write something that is unique, your chances are much higher.

As to the gameplay portion, you can really do anything at all with the commands, as Demonsul has said. As long as you don't demand the impossible of your country, you should have no problems with doing what you want. Of course, the key to the States genre is to react to, or even anticipate the consequences and adjust accordingly. I remember that in CS1, where I was part of a triumvirate along with Palamedes (The real power behind the throne) and KawaiiMelon (All I remember is that the character was drunk. All the time), even when our country was doing well, there were always problems to fix and improvements to be made.

I'm actually very eager to see another States game; now that I think about it, most of them have ended very early into the game proper. CS2 definitely didn't last as long in-game wise as CS1, GGG lasted only until the end of the initial revolt, CS3, BAMN, CiS, and Politico ended very quickly, and Munda Nova lasted 6 in-game year turns.

(for a description of all of these games, please see the CS WIKI)

The one, the only, Vancho!
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06-27-2013, 01:40 AM
Post: #31
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Vancho is mostly correct in his post, and his list of states games that collapsed in on themselves (Including my disastrous first Heirs of Perdition game) is why I am doing a back to basics states game in the first place as CS1 was easily the most stable (even if it was killed by its own backgame which stressed Demonsul out to no end.)
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06-27-2013, 04:19 AM (This post was last modified: 06-27-2013 04:30 AM by Druplesnubb.)
Post: #32
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
I'm wondering how much time will have to be spent on this thing. While I'm interested in playing I also have a life and I can't devote all my time to it. If it's something like an hour a week I'm probably fine but not if it's closer to an hour a day.

Also, are those grey things mountains? Because I have an idea for a mountain-based state.
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06-27-2013, 05:23 AM (This post was last modified: 06-27-2013 05:24 AM by Galloglasses.)
Post: #33
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
(06-27-2013 04:19 AM)Druplesnubb Wrote:  I'm wondering how much time will have to be spent on this thing. While I'm interested in playing I also have a life and I can't devote all my time to it. If it's something like an hour a week I'm probably fine but not if it's closer to an hour a day.

Also, are those grey things mountains? Because I have an idea for a mountain-based state.

The brown splotches are mountains and mountain ranges, the big grey blob surrounding the extended map is a Fog of War, and represents your civilization's extent of knowledge of how big the world is.

Turns, usually take a week or two weeks to complete if several people are lagging behind. War turns might be more frequent to relevant players and are done over PMs, I will post a PM to you at the start of a turn in which you have some time to forumlate your response and what you want to do with your nation to the developing scenario about it, as well as utilising the time to initiate OOG plans and diplomacy with other players which then need to be acted out in game for effect. Really, there is quite alot to do in a states game. If you have a very very hectic lifestyle with limited or no free time, I'd advise against it or you'd risk making very rash decisions.
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06-27-2013, 05:33 AM (This post was last modified: 06-27-2013 06:17 AM by Druplesnubb.)
Post: #34
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
I'm studying at a university college so I'm probably gonna have my hands full at weekdays but I'll have several free hours during weekends except for when there's examinations going on. Does that sound like enough time to participate in this game?

My main concern is how much time the individual turns will require. Going to this forum once a week is a piece of cake. Spending five hours once a week here on the other hand, is a problem.
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06-27-2013, 05:57 AM
Post: #35
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
(06-27-2013 05:33 AM)Druplesnubb Wrote:  I'm studying at a university college so I'm probably gonna have my hands full at weekdays but I'll have several free hours during weekends except for when there's examinations going on. Does that sound like enough time to participate in this game?

My main concern is how much time the individual turns will require. Going to this forum once a week is a piece of cake. Spending five hours once a week here on the other hand, is.

Then I'd advise against it, you'd need more then five hours per week to get the full worth of this states game.
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06-27-2013, 08:15 AM
Post: #36
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
(06-27-2013 05:57 AM)Galloglasses Wrote:  Then I'd advise against it, you'd need more then five hours per week to get the full worth of this states game.

Does it really take you that long to think up your commands when you're a player, Gallo? I can usually throw something together in an hour, then leave it open in a tab for the rest of the day as I put off proof-reading it. :P
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06-27-2013, 08:27 AM
Post: #37
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
(06-27-2013 08:15 AM)Demonsul Wrote:  
(06-27-2013 05:57 AM)Galloglasses Wrote:  Then I'd advise against it, you'd need more then five hours per week to get the full worth of this states game.

Does it really take you that long to think up your commands when you're a player, Gallo? I can usually throw something together in an hour, then leave it open in a tab for the rest of the day as I put off proof-reading it. :P

Actually it takes me, personally, significantly less time to respond to my commands, a vast majority of them taking less then 15 minutes to formulate unless you hit me with one of your notorious curve balls. However I know for alot of people it takes them time, and they need time to do all they want to do because of other commitments.
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06-27-2013, 08:34 AM
Post: #38
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Depending on the States game, it can take me between five minutes and five hours. Five minutes if I'm having tons of fun, five hours if I need to force myself to do it. >_>

If this is going back to basics, though, that means there'll likely be "war turns" (really fast, easy commands) and "year/season turns" (very time-consuming, thoughtful commands with tons of influence). Don't know that for sure, but that's how CS1 and a good portion of CS2 worked.
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06-27-2013, 08:42 AM
Post: #39
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
One of the problems with estimating how long a turn will take for me is that I don't really know what exactly you do during that turn. What is the usual turn like in terms of actions and commands?
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06-27-2013, 09:30 AM (This post was last modified: 06-27-2013 09:31 AM by Demonsul.)
Post: #40
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
You usually receive a few paragraphs of events every turn - anywhere between one or two short paragraphs to an entire page, depending on what is happening. You reply with anything from bullet points to full, in-character paragraphs of your own, basically however you like. At least that's how it tends to work when I run these games.
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06-27-2013, 09:47 AM
Post: #41
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
(06-27-2013 09:30 AM)Demonsul Wrote:  You usually receive a few paragraphs of events every turn - anywhere between one or two short paragraphs to an entire page, depending on what is happening. You reply with anything from bullet points to full, in-character paragraphs of your own, basically however you like. At least that's how it tends to work when I run these games.

^This
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06-27-2013, 10:47 AM (This post was last modified: 07-03-2013 09:34 AM by Pagan.)
Post: #42
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Player Name: Pagan
Civilization/Tribe Name: The Asking
Ruler/s Name: Androcles the Foresighted
Banner/flag: [Image: hlhoeB6.png]
What is your tribe generally known for: Masonry, Trapping, Philosophy
Biography: Many generations ago, a boy came to his father with a string, on the end hung the corpse of a rabbit. His father asked him how he came to get a rabbit, they were far too fast for the child to catch without help. The boy told his father of the snare he had made, and his father shared the idea with the rest of the tribe. It was at this point that The Asking, at the time called the Demet, settled in place. They smoked the meat of all they caught, building larger snares for larger game, and placing traps for rival tribes to stumble upon in their nomadic lives, to discourage hunting in their lands. This simple and sedentary lifestyle, however, led to a boredom amongst the people, no need to travel to new lands in search of food, little worry of raiding tribes. In this boredom bred thought. The men and women of the tribe began to wonder about life and reality. They named the dots of light across the sky and wondered how they came to be. Surely, it was not a human which had made such fires so far above, anyone to be that high would clearly fall to their death. They watched as the moon passed over head, changing size, and they recorded the position of each phase with large stones so that future generations could study it further. They produced monuments to tell the seasons, so that they could gather the ripest fruits and prepare the proper snares. But still, they longed to understand the world, changing their name to The Asking and appointing the most inquisitive of the tribe to lead them. Twice a month, the tribe gathered and discussed what they learned and theorized about reality and the conditions of existence.

Androcles, born to Sophocles and Darshana, was but 13 when his knowledge came to the sight of the rest of the tribe. It was the 1st discussion of the month, when the topic of nomads on the horizon came to surface. Most feared they would come from the south, through lighter woods, not the thicker forest, and narrowly avoid the traps protecting the grounds they used for food. None knew how to combat them, when Androcles spoke up. He suggested that they use the stones of the land and the mud of the river to build walls around the village, large closest to the buildings, and a series of progressively smaller walls as they got farther away, "For future expansion." The tribe, without any better ideas, began construction as the nomads passed out of the land peacefully. The walls continued to be made, as the tribe knew it'd only be a matter of time until a more violent group approached. It was this idea which earned Androcles his title, the foresighted, as weeks later a group of marauders approached the structure, picked off by snares hidden amongst the tall grass near the walls before leaving due to the pain of the approach, which grew progressively more dangerous with each wall they had to cross. His idea earned him the role of leader, and he has since led to a revolution of construction amongst the Asking, the wooden huts of old now replaced by stone-walled structures with wooden roofs, which cut down on the number of smoke-house fires, as stone doesn't burn. Truly, Androcles is idolized by his people, now 22 and still in power for his one idea that changed the face of the tribe.

The home of the Asking, Radix Gnosis, is a walled in community centred around a library. Inside are a large number of scrolls detailing astronomical events, cycles, coincidences between events in the sky and on the earth, seasons, and the logs of the tribal meetings. The space directly around this library is an open area, a cobblestone plaza where the meetings take place, and where children are told to play. Around this, are smoke houses and the butchery, intermingling with the housing. The inner most wall of the town is right on the edge of the housing, reaching ~4 metres tall and ~2 metres thick, followed by a gap of grass for several metres, before a ~1 metre tall and thick wall. This pattern of space and walls continues for about half a kilometre, the grass between spaces growing to almost cover the lower walls, where snares are set up.

The Asking do not worship gods, instead, celebrating the seasons. On each solstice there is a feast, and it is widely believed that a child conceived on the solstice will be a great mind that will accomplish much in their lifetime. They have named all bodies in the night sky, and the arrival of "shooting stars" are recorded, in hopes that one day a pattern will be found in their paths. All they know is recorded on the scrolls stored in their "Great Library". They watch for patterns in everything, in hopes of answering their biggest question. Why?

It is tradition to greet others in passing with a sharp nod, and greeting with a hug when further socialization would occur. The division of labour is determined by physical and mental capability, not by an arbitrary line such as sex. Clothing is made of furs gathered from trapped animals, and purchased from traders through fur and meat trade, and as such clothing styles are highly varied from person to person.

The Asking people are quick to tan and have a broad range of skin tones, ranging from a pale tan to a golden brown. Green eyes are prominent, as is blue-black hair. Most people don't cut their hair and have it tied into one or more braids of varying complexity.

Tattooing, using bone needles and various natural dyes, is common, although not extensive on most. Usually one will have between 2 and 12 tattoos by age 16, depicting events and discoveries of their past. These tattoos are usually made of lines of varying thickness, due to the scarcity of dye variety making solid filled colours expensive as well as dangerous.

Working Name: Anarkismo
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06-27-2013, 11:05 AM (This post was last modified: 06-27-2013 11:06 AM by Druplesnubb.)
Post: #43
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
I'm pretty sure none of these civilizations will have weeks since that's something that only exists because of Judaism.
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06-27-2013, 11:15 AM
Post: #44
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
(06-27-2013 11:05 AM)Druplesnubb Wrote:  I'm pretty sure none of these civilizations will have weeks since that's something that only exists because of Judaism.

Eh, you can let them have their concept of time management subjective to cultures, at the end of the day its the GM who decides when winter comes.
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06-27-2013, 11:35 AM
Post: #45
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Made it so it is a 2/moon cycle aka month, because I've no reason to use weeks specifically. Months were just too long of an inbetween period.
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06-28-2013, 10:40 PM
Post: #46
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Including Supernerd's App, I now have 7 applications for the game. Does anyone else want to submit an application?
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06-29-2013, 07:34 AM (This post was last modified: 06-29-2013 08:24 AM by Supernerd.)
Post: #47
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
I'll have a presentable biography up before the end of the day.
Edit: And... done. Is it acceptable now?
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06-29-2013, 08:47 AM
Post: #48
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
Yes that is acceptable. Though your tribe doesnt cook its food (unorthodox but nothing wrong with it) I assume it also doesn't have agriculture? If so thats fine, your tribe is basically a tribe of hunters who found a plentiful source of food. But does this mean your tribe doesn't have basic metalworking at this era? Again its fine if they don't, plenty of peoples and cultures lagged behind iron and bronze working by the early Iron age era IRL, its just you're putting your tribe at a significant disadvantage. Unless you intended such for roleplay reasons, which again, is fine.
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06-29-2013, 09:10 AM (This post was last modified: 06-29-2013 09:10 AM by Supernerd.)
Post: #49
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
The idea was to trade off modern (relative to the timezone) technology and a bit of common sense in exchange for tougher citizens. Would animal husbandry be a fair trade off for basic metalworking? I'm fairly sure that war elephants and stuff were used in that era.
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06-29-2013, 09:49 AM
Post: #50
RE: Iron States: Spring's promise
war elephants were being used yes, but that is far more difficult then your basic animal husbandry which its assumed everyone has at least.
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